Saturday , January 22 2022
Home / T. Cowen: Marginal Revolution / The political polarization of U.S. firms

The political polarization of U.S. firms

Summary:
Executive teams in U.S. firms are becoming increasingly partisan, leading to a political polarization of corporate America. We establish this new fact using political affiliations from voter registration records for top executives of S&P 1500 firms between 2008 and 2018. The rise in partisanship is explained by both an increasing share of Republican executives and increased sorting by partisan executives into firms with like-minded individuals. Further, we find that within a given firm-year, executives whose political views do not match those of the team’s majority have a higher probability of leaving the firm. The increase in partisanship is taking place despite executive teams becoming more diverse in terms of gender and race. That is from a new paper by Vyacheslav Fos, Elisabeth Kempf,

Topics:
Tyler Cowen considers the following as important: ,

This could be interesting, too:

Tyler Cowen writes Are artificial wombs a left-wing or right-wing proposal?

Tyler Cowen writes Modeling Vladimir Putin

Tyler Cowen writes My Israel-only Conversation with the excellent Russ Roberts

Tyler Cowen writes When is a prediction right or wrong?

Executive teams in U.S. firms are becoming increasingly partisan, leading to a political polarization of corporate America. We establish this new fact using political affiliations from voter registration records for top executives of S&P 1500 firms between 2008 and 2018. The rise in partisanship is explained by both an increasing share of Republican executives and increased sorting by partisan executives into firms with like-minded individuals. Further, we find that within a given firm-year, executives whose political views do not match those of the team’s majority have a higher probability of leaving the firm. The increase in partisanship is taking place despite executive teams becoming more diverse in terms of gender and race.

That is from a new paper by Vyacheslav Fos, Elisabeth Kempf, and Margarita Tsoutsoura.

The post The political polarization of U.S. firms appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

Tyler Cowen
Tyler Cowen is an American economist, academic, and writer. He occupies the Holbert C. Harris Chair of economics as a professor at George Mason University and is co-author, with Alex Tabarrok, of the popular economics blog Marginal Revolution. Cowen and Tabarrok have also ventured into online education by starting Marginal Revolution University. He currently writes the "Economic Scene" column for the New York Times, and he also writes for such publications as The New Republic, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Newsweek, and the Wilson Quarterly.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *