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Biblical Adverse Selection

Summary:
And Jesus said, Behold, two men went forth each to buy a new car. And the car of the first man was good and served its owner well; but the second man’s was like unto a lemon, and worked not. But in time both men grew tired of their cars, and wished to be rid of them. Thus the two men went down unto the market, to sell their cars. The first spoke to the crowd that had gathered there, saying honestly, My car is good, and you should pay well for it; But the second man went alongside him, and bearing false witness, said also, My car is good, and you should pay well for it. Then the crowd looked between the cars, and said unto them, How can we know which of ye telleth the truth, and which wisheth falsely to pass on his lemon? And they resolved themselves not to pay for either car as if it were

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And Jesus said, Behold, two men went forth each to buy a new car.

And the car of the first man was good and served its owner well; but the second man’s was like unto a lemon, and worked not.

But in time both men grew tired of their cars, and wished to be rid of them. Thus the two men went down unto the market, to sell their cars.

The first spoke to the crowd that had gathered there, saying honestly, My car is good, and you should pay well for it;

But the second man went alongside him, and bearing false witness, said also, My car is good, and you should pay well for it.

Then the crowd looked between the cars, and said unto them, How can we know which of ye telleth the truth, and which wisheth falsely to pass on his lemon?

And they resolved themselves not to pay for either car as if it were good, but to pay a little less than this price.

Now the man with a good car, hearing this, took his car away from the market, saying to the crowd, If ye will not pay full price for my good car, then I wish not to sell it to you;

But the man with a bad car said, I will sell you my car for this price; for he knew that his car was bad and was worth less than this price.

But as the first man left, the crowd returned to the second man and said, If thy car is good, why then dost thou not leave to keep the car, when we will pay less than it is worth? Thy car must be a lemon, and we will pay only the price of a lemon.

The second man was upset that his deception had been uncovered; but he could not gainsay the conclusion of the market, and so he sold his car for just the price of a lemon.

And the crowd reasoned, If any man cometh now to sell his car unto us, that car must be a lemon; since we will pay only the price of a lemon.

And Lo, the market reached its Nash equilibrium.

From username42 on Reddit. Hat tip: Michael Lane.

Your challenge: Explain an economics principle the King James Way.

The post Biblical Adverse Selection appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

Alex Tabarrok
Alex Tabarrok is Bartley J. Madden Chair in Economics at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and a professor of economics at George Mason University. He specializes in patent-system reform, the effectiveness of bounty hunters compared to the police, how judicial elections bias judges, and how local poverty rates impact trial decisions by juries. He also examines methods for increasing the supply of human organs for transplant, the regulation of pharmaceuticals by the FDA, and voting systems.

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