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The new Flynn effect?

Summary:
People can type almost as fast on a phone screen as they do on a computer keyboard, suggests a study. Average typing speeds on mobiles are now 38 words per minute (wpm) compared to about 52 on a standard PC keyboard. The gap was narrower among people aged 10-19 who averaged about 10wpm more than older users, it found. The amount of time that people spend using their phones every day has honed typing skills, said the team that carried out the work… The fastest phone typist hit a speed of 85wpm, the study found. Oh, and this: Phone speeds were helped by auto-correct systems but hindered by other aids that seek to predict what word a person had begun to type. The time it took people to work out whether a predicted word was correct ended up slowing them down, it found. By contrast,

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People can type almost as fast on a phone screen as they do on a computer keyboard, suggests a study.

Average typing speeds on mobiles are now 38 words per minute (wpm) compared to about 52 on a standard PC keyboard.

The gap was narrower among people aged 10-19 who averaged about 10wpm more than older users, it found.

The amount of time that people spend using their phones every day has honed typing skills, said the team that carried out the work…

The fastest phone typist hit a speed of 85wpm, the study found.

Oh, and this:

Phone speeds were helped by auto-correct systems but hindered by other aids that seek to predict what word a person had begun to type.

The time it took people to work out whether a predicted word was correct ended up slowing them down, it found.

By contrast, auto-correct systems that eliminated the need for a few thumb strokes helped people finish messages faster.

Here is the article, via Michelle Dawson.

The post The new Flynn effect? appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

Tyler Cowen
Tyler Cowen is an American economist, academic, and writer. He occupies the Holbert C. Harris Chair of economics as a professor at George Mason University and is co-author, with Alex Tabarrok, of the popular economics blog Marginal Revolution. Cowen and Tabarrok have also ventured into online education by starting Marginal Revolution University. He currently writes the "Economic Scene" column for the New York Times, and he also writes for such publications as The New Republic, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Newsweek, and the Wilson Quarterly.

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