Monday , November 18 2019
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Saturday assorted links

Summary:
1. Knur and Spell: the creative destruction of bygone sports. 2. Is The Sheraton censoring Taiwan? 3. Bank of Jamaica uses reggae music to teach monetary policy (WSJ). 4. The origins of various PC ideas. 5. How to avoid currency conversion charges on your credit card use overseas (NYT). 6. China announced fact of the day: “China’s Ministry of Education announced that the country has built the world’s largest higher education system with the gross enrollment ratio in higher education rising to 48.1 percent from 0.26 percent in 1949.” The post Saturday assorted links appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

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1. Knur and Spell: the creative destruction of bygone sports.

2. Is The Sheraton censoring Taiwan?

3. Bank of Jamaica uses reggae music to teach monetary policy (WSJ).

4. The origins of various PC ideas.

5. How to avoid currency conversion charges on your credit card use overseas (NYT).

6. China announced fact of the day: “China’s Ministry of Education announced that the country has built the world’s largest higher education system with the gross enrollment ratio in higher education rising to 48.1 percent from 0.26 percent in 1949.”

The post Saturday assorted links appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

Tyler Cowen
Tyler Cowen is an American economist, academic, and writer. He occupies the Holbert C. Harris Chair of economics as a professor at George Mason University and is co-author, with Alex Tabarrok, of the popular economics blog Marginal Revolution. Cowen and Tabarrok have also ventured into online education by starting Marginal Revolution University. He currently writes the "Economic Scene" column for the New York Times, and he also writes for such publications as The New Republic, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Newsweek, and the Wilson Quarterly.

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