Friday , January 28 2022

Assorted Links

Summary:
Business School professor Christian Stadler names his “best ten business books of 2021“. A good list, including “The Data Detective” (US/Can readers can pre-order the paperback, out 1 Feb). Michael Bungay Stanier’s “How To Begin” is out tomorrow. Classic self-help, about setting and achieving worthy goals. If you suspect you need to read this book you are probably right. Dave Morris offers sharp advice as to how to sketch out an idea for a story. Aspiring novelists and scriptwriters, pay attention! My colleagues at Pushkin have released a superbly rich audiobook, Miracle and Wonder. It consists of interviews with Paul Simon, new performances of his best and most interesting songs, and typically intriguing analysis by Malcolm Gladwell about why Paul Simon is so

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Tim Harford writes The Expectation Effect, by David Robson

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Tim Harford writes Treacle Walker, by Alan Garner

Tim Harford writes Book of the Week: The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg

Business School professor Christian Stadler names his “best ten business books of 2021“. A good list, including “The Data Detective” (US/Can readers can pre-order the paperback, out 1 Feb).

Michael Bungay Stanier’s “How To Begin” is out tomorrow. Classic self-help, about setting and achieving worthy goals. If you suspect you need to read this book you are probably right.

Dave Morris offers sharp advice as to how to sketch out an idea for a story. Aspiring novelists and scriptwriters, pay attention!

My colleagues at Pushkin have released a superbly rich audiobook, Miracle and Wonder. It consists of interviews with Paul Simon, new performances of his best and most interesting songs, and typically intriguing analysis by Malcolm Gladwell about why Paul Simon is so enduringly creative. I loved it.

On video, my FT colleague Martin Sandbu @MESandbu presents the case for a universal basic income.

In my book, Messy, I argued that Erwin Rommel, Tyson Fury, Donald Trump and Magnus Carlsen had one thing in common. They would rather make a flawed move that put their opponent off balance than make a perfect move that left their opponent feeling more comfortable. New evidence here that Carlsen is still doing it, and it’s still working for him.

I am exploring other, less combative, themes from Messy as part of an event with the Orchestra of the Age of Englightenment; come along either in London or Oxford on Sunday 30th January 2022. It will be awesome!

Tim Harford
Tim is an economist, journalist and broadcaster. He is author of “Messy” and the million-selling “The Undercover Economist”, a senior columnist at the Financial Times, and the presenter of Radio 4’s “More or Less” and the iTunes-topping series “Fifty Things That Made the Modern Economy”. Tim has spoken at TED, PopTech and the Sydney Opera House and is a visiting fellow of Nuffield College, Oxford.

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