Saturday , January 25 2020
Home / Tag Archives: sugar

Tag Archives: sugar

Afternoon roundup

The worthies on a much-belated closing of the browser tabs:Zero waste protesters have been sending their rubbish to MPs using Parliament's Freepost service. Could the rest of us do the same if central government waste disposal levies make using landfill a bit more expensive than it really ought to be? Nice piece in The Atlantic on Article 25 of the Constitution, which allows for the removal of a President medically unfit for office. Trump's speech in which he talked about building a wall in...

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Skegg

A rather one-sided piece over at the ODT points me to a new short book from the Otago Public Health shop.  Let's take these in turn.The ODT piece has Bruce Munro gush over Otago public health's David Skegg and Skegg's latest book, published by Bridget Williams (of course). The basic thrust of the piece is that noble public health academics have been trying for policies that they know will reduce all the harms from alcohol, and smoking, and sugar, and that only the nefarious actions of...

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Afternoon roundup, and around the traps

The worthies on the closing of the browser tabs.Nice comparison of vacant housing to transitional unemployment, in an American context. Filing this one away here for the next time somebody notices a few empty houses and decides that policy should do something about it. It comes up too often.  Susan Edmunds over at Stuff looks at household income distributions; the piece includes a short bit from me on AHC- and BHC- incomes.  Universities need to lift their darned game.  AUT not only caved at...

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A sugar intervention that actually looks promising

Usually I'm pointing to daft stuff on the sugar file.  But my jaw dropped when I read this one. An intervention that sounded sensible, that's been piloted, that looks effective, and is quite possibly cost-effective too.Here's RNZ: But dental decay in even the most deprived communities could be prevented by the simple method of brushing teeth once a day at school, and a Northland study had proved it, and the government should take heed, Dr Stallworthy said.In 2015, DHB dentist Ellen Clark...

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What counts as ‘Moderate’ reliability for Cochrane?

Glenn Boyle prompted me to hit the Cochrane Review's findings around SSB price interventions a bit more closely. If this counts as moderately reliable evidence, well, draw your own conclusions about the weight to put on the stuff they count as low or very low reliability.Here are the three studies they evaluated.Cornelsen 2017. They looked at a 10 pence price hike on SSBs across a chain of UK restaurants. 9% reduction in SSB items sold per customer. While there was a 22% increase in...

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Sweet restrictions

The Science Media Centre asked me for comment on the latest Cochrane Review on interventions around sugar.Reading through the thing, I was struck by the weakness of evidence around a lot of the kinds of things folks here like to demand that the government do.Cochrane rates the certainty of evidence on a scale that runs: very low, low, moderate, high.The interventions with the strongest evidence base around environmental interventions aimed at reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages...

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Herald on sugar

Kudos to Boyd Swinburn and the usual anti-sugar folks for getting this wonderful piece of advocacy published in the Herald as journalism rather than advertorial or op-ed. I'm cancelling my subscription to the Herald and asking for a refund of the balance of my annual subscription fee, but that's a bit beside the point. Swinburn et al have done a great job here with cheer-leading reporter Luke Kirkness. Here we go. "I've finished pulling teeth today, my right hand's actually sore I pulled...

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Red meat tax?

Boyd Swinburn's group wants rather a lot more controls on what we all get to eat.  Radio NZ covers his report here; Chris Snowdon's summary of it is best. The lead author of the report is Boyd Swinburn, a New Zealand doctor and food campaigner who declared last week on Twitter that the EAT-Lancet report shows where diets need to get to while his report shows how to get there. They are two sides of the same coin and whilst there is no shortage of policy suggestions in the EAT-Lancet...

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Ration books

The IEA's Chris Snowdon tries to live by the ration book that The Lancet's public health people would impose on the UK.First up, the recommended diet, from page five of their report. I like that they have a 31 gram ration of sweets.*  Anyway, Chris does his best. But it doesn't look all that appealing.  Here's breakfast: [WATCH] The IEA's very own health warrior @CJSnowdon decided to try the @TheLancet's delicious nutrition guidelines for breakfast this morning! 🥓🍳...

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Back to the sweet sweet bog

For the past several years, the public health crowd has brushed off John Gibson's work on sugar taxes by saying that they don't worry about things that aren't in refereed journals.It takes a lot longer to get things published in economics journals than in public health. Inaccuracies in public health work can then go around the world's newspapers several times before economics starts testing the more robust work in series of departmental seminars before sending the revised and improved draft...

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