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Home / Tag Archives: Political Science

Tag Archives: Political Science

Are artificial wombs a left-wing or right-wing proposal?

On one hand, it is pro-natalist, so that makes it right-wing. On the other hand it is (ostensibly?) feminist, relieving a burden on women, so that makes it left-wing. It also could be construed as trying to “equalize family,” which would be left-wing or even communist. Under another reading, it is about “corporate babies,” which pushes it a back into the right-wing camp. From yet another perspective, no one really thinks it will happen, at least not soon.  So the...

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Modeling Vladimir Putin

That is the subject of my latest Bloomberg column, here is one excerpt: Economists typically define rationality as the effective use of means to achieve ends — spending your money for maximum enjoyment, for example. That is fine for some purposes, but it fails when it comes to understanding those political leaders, Putin included, who are obsessed with power. The economic framework doesn’t work well when power is the end itself. While no one can truly know what’s in the mind of Putin, he...

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My Israel-only Conversation with the excellent Russ Roberts

Here is the audio, video, and transcript, here is the CWT summary: In this special crossover special with EconTalk, Tyler interviews Russ Roberts about his new life in Israel as president of Shalem College. They discuss why there are so few new universities, managing teams in the face of linguistic and cultural barriers, how Israeli society could adapt to the loss of universal military service, why Israeli TV is so good, what American Jews don’t understand about life in Israel, what his next...

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When is a prediction right or wrong?

When I lived in Germany in the mid-1980s, it seemed obvious to me that the chances of a pending German reunification were pretty high.  West Germany seemed obsessed with its status as a separated twin.  That seemed everywhere in the serious literature and film of the time.  Yet all my German friends insisted that my expectations were nonsense and that they absolutely had moved on and did not care one whit about East Germany.  Still, to me the yearnings were obvious. At that time I was...

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Why Does the CDC Do This?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday advised Americans to avoid travel to Canada, citing “very high” levels of the coronavirus. Canada was placed under a Level 4 travel health notice — the highest category…“Because of the current situation in Canada, even fully vaccinated travelers may be at risk for getting and spreading Covid-19 variants,” the C.D.C. said. It’s very strange. It’s as if the CDC are on auto pilot and even after two years can’t...

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The political polarization of U.S. firms

Executive teams in U.S. firms are becoming increasingly partisan, leading to a political polarization of corporate America. We establish this new fact using political affiliations from voter registration records for top executives of S&P 1500 firms between 2008 and 2018. The rise in partisanship is explained by both an increasing share of Republican executives and increased sorting by partisan executives into firms with like-minded individuals. Further, we find that within a given...

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Do all left-leaning institutions need to unionize?

That is the topic of my latest Bloomberg column, here is one excerpt: Columbia University, with its sizable endowment, is a relatively well-capitalized entity. Still, it’s appropriate to ask what problem is solved by a graduate student union. The main difficulty for these students seems to be a lack of jobs when they graduate, and a pay hike might crowd the field further, with unwelcome consequences for the job market. And in the long run, the university could simply cut back on its initial...

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Japan facts of the day

Compared with the previous year, the survey showed a drop in the number of people who wanted to work and study abroad, work with foreigners in Japan and learn foreign languages. Most notably the percentage of those who wanted to “use English for a job” declined from its 2020 peak by 10.6 points to 38 per cent. And: …the support for the ruling Liberal Democratic party among young people was higher than in other generations. That, said Junji Nakagawa, a professor at Chuo Gakuin...

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My Holberg Prize talk honoring Cass Sunstein

This is from 2018, I hadn’t know it was put on-line this last summer.  The title is about threats to democracy, but much of the actual 24-minute talk is about Cass.  Cass won the Holberg Prize that year, and I was asked to be one of the honoring speakers at the ceremony.  Here goes: The fish and chips in Bergen was excellent. And for this pointer I thank Clara B. Jones. The post My Holberg Prize talk honoring Cass Sunstein appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION....

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Noah Smith Substack interviews me

Here is the interview.  Here is one excerpt: N.S.: So how would you generally describe the zeitgeist of the moment, if you had to give a simple summary? What do you think are a couple of most important trends in culture and thought right now? My impression has been that we’re sort of in a replay of the 70s — a period of exhaustion after several years of intense social unrest, where people are looking around for new cultural and economic paradigms to replace the ones we just...

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