Friday , December 6 2019
Home / Tag Archives: health

Tag Archives: health

Vaccination, compulsion, and paternalism for the lower orders

The National Party has come out in support of encouraging greater vaccination uptake.But it sure isn't the way I'd do it.National's suggested docking the benefits of those on benefit whose kids aren't keeping up with their vaccinations. Some in National have suggested extending that to payments under Working for Families, but that appears more controversial.We can go back to first principles and note that there's a reasonable case for government intervention to encourage vaccination - as I...

Read More »

Public health, externality, and vaccination

Paternalism is contentious. Arguments for state action to protect us from ourselves are fraught. I come down pretty heavily on the anti-paternalism side of the argument, but I've heard respectable defences of paternalism. But policy around vaccination is hardly paternalistic. There's a clear market failure that could be pointed to in any sound Regulatory Impact Statement.In a place with relatively high vaccination rates, the primary benefit from your getting vaccinated goes to other...

Read More »

When Fewer Options are Better for Consumers: The Benefits of Narrow Health Insurance Networks

Summary Should health insurers be required to allow their enrollees to visit any hospital or doctor?  Many insurers limit enrollees to “in-network” medical providers, forcing them to pay significant “out-of-network” costs if they seek care elsewhere. Our research examines the role that limited medical provider networks play in the U.S. commercial healthcare market and measures both their impact on...

Read More »

Mind Fixers

The Spinoff has a superb piece by Danyl McLauchlan reviewing Anne Harrington's Mind Fixers. Thomas Szasz makes an appearance. A snippet: In January of 1973 the psychologist David Rosenhan published an article in Science, one of the world’s most influential academic journals, titled ‘On Being Sane in Insane Places’. He’d conducted an experiment in which eight people (including himself) presented to twelve different psychiatric hospitals across the US, complaining of audible hallucinations:...

Read More »

Subsidizing health insurance for low-income adults: evidence from Massachusetts

Summary How much are low-income individuals willing to pay for health insurance? And what are the implications for insurance market reforms that propose to change government subsidies? Using administrative data from the pioneer subsidized insurance exchange in Massachusetts over the period 2009 to 2013, this study exploits discontinuities in the premium subsidy schedule to estimate willingness to pay and...

Read More »

Vaccines

Hooray, New Zealand gets a measles outbreak. Whether it's due to middle-class antivaxxers, or kids whose parents just have a hard time getting them to the GP - who knows. But what doesn't make sense to me is why school-based immunisations aren't comprehensive. Year 7 and 8 students get immunisations at school - for schools that are participating. The kids there get their tetanus, diptheria and whooping cough booster, and the HPV vaccine.  There's a national vaccinations register, so...

Read More »

Should Congress Use The Income Tax To Discourage Consumer Drug Ads?

Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) and a score of Democratic cosponsors want to use the tax code to discourage direct-to-consumer advertising by drug companies. Their bill, the End Taxpayer Subsidies for Drug Ads Act, would prohibit firms from taking tax deductions for any consumer advertising of prescription drugs. Limiting tax deductions is a blunt and arbitrary way of approaching a legitimate concern. Consumer drug ads play an important role in debates about the costs of prescription...

Read More »

Should Congress Use The Income Tax To Discourage Consumer Drug Ads?

Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) and a score of Democratic cosponsors want to use the tax code to discourage direct-to-consumer advertising by drug companies. Their bill, the End Taxpayer Subsidies for Drug Ads Act, would prohibit firms from taking tax deductions for any consumer advertising of prescription drugs. Limiting tax deductions is a blunt and arbitrary way of approaching a legitimate concern. Consumer drug ads play an important role in debates about the costs of prescription...

Read More »

Health spending over time

There has been some comment on the fact that, with recent increases in spending on the NHS, the health budget is taking a growing proportion of UK state spending. I am missing Flip Chart Fairy Tales, so here is a chart heavy post to make one or two obvious points that regrettably are often missing from political reporting. The first is that health has been taking up a growing slice of our total expenditure (i.e.GDP: expenditure on everything including investment) for a very long time. Here is...

Read More »

Private-Public health partnerships

If I ever get homesick for Canada, a five-minute conversation with a Canadian government official's usually an excellent cure. It always reminds me why I left. On Friday, I met with a few visiting Canadians to give a bit of a state of play on policy. One of them asked about the Pharmac system. I noted it seems the best part of the overall health system, but that I can't imagine that a larger country could get away with it - and especially not a country right next door to the US.But as part...

Read More »