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Tag Archives: Frances Woolley

Why do I have to collect my pension already?

Ontario's Ford government has a plan to induce professors over 71 to retire. I wrote a column in the Globe and Mail about it. Here's a sneak peak: Nearly one in 10 Ontario university professors is over the age of 65. As of 2016, these professors were earning, on average, $184,947 a year. Moreover, because federal legislation requires all taxpayers to start drawing down their retirement savings at the age of 71, septuagenarian professors can collect a six-figure pension on top of a...

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About that EKOS poll

A recent EKOS poll found "the incidence of [Canadians] thinking there are too many visible minorities is up significantly and no longer trails opposition to general immigration (as it has historically)." Here is a picture that shows the question EKOS asked, and the long-term trend in Canadians' responses to this question (click on the picture to make it bigger): The poll generated a certain amount of discussion (e.g. here and here). Andray Domise, writing in Macleans, observed: And given...

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Do Chinese Canadians struggle in the labour market?

Update: The paper discussed in this blog is currently being updated. I will post a link to the revised version here when it becomes available. The revised results are close to those obtained using the PUMF. Thanks to Feng Hou for taking these concerns seriously and responding to them promptly. A recent Statistics Canada study by Wen-Hao Chen and Feng Hou reported a disturbing finding. Many second generation visible minority Canadians - "individuals who were born in Canada to at...

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Breaking up the quarter million dollar club

Ontario eliminated mandatory retirement in 2006. Six years later, professors started to enter the quarter million dollar dollar club. This exclusive group is comprised of university professors aged 71 or older who, due to the curious interaction of federal pension legislation and academic collective agreements, are able to collect a full pension and a full salary. The average salary of a full professor in Canada is around $166,000 per year (calculations available here:  Download Average...

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Has Canada’s female employment rate maxed out?

Trends in employment rates have three distinct elements. The first is cohort effects. For example, women born in the 1920s and 1930s, for the most part, dropped out of the labour force when they had children. Many did not return. Their daughters, the Baby Boomers, entered the labour force in large numbers, and stayed in.  Those decisions had effects that lingered for decades. Women born in 1935, for example, were still in the employment rate calculations - and depressing female...

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Learning outcomes: potential game-changer, or worthless bean-counting and cataloguing exercise?

The argument: Inadequate teaching in universities is an old problem. The latest attempt to solve this problem involves the use of National Qualifications Frameworks (NQFs) and Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs). Roughly speaking, qualification frameworks state the learning outcomes or competencies students need to demonstrate in order to be awarded an educational credential.  These frameworks have many goals. With respect to teaching, the hope is that by specifying, in general terms, what...

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Learning outcomes: potential game-changer, or worthless bean-counting and cataloguing exercise?

The argument: Inadequate teaching in universities is an old problem. The latest attempt to solve this problem involves the use of National Qualifications Frameworks (NQFs) and Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs). Roughly speaking, qualification frameworks state the learning outcomes or competencies students need to demonstrate in order to be awarded an educational credential.  These frameworks have many goals. With respect to teaching, the hope is that by specifying, in general terms, what...

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Australia really sucked in the 70s

Frances Woolley points to Barbara Spencer's Address to the Canadian Women Economist's Network lunch at the 2002 Canadian Economic Association meetings. I hadn't read it before.Some less-than-fun features of Oz through the early 1970s to which Spencer points:Until 1966, any woman in the public service who married had to resign, unless she were a secretary and could join the typing pool; Women in the public service, until 1969, were required to be on lower pay; It took until 1972 for...

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A gnomic theory of higher education

Here are the powerpoint slides (.pdf format) for my CEA Presidential Address "The Political Economy of University Education in Canada": DOWNLOAD WOOLLEY PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS SLIDES HERE.  The talk will be written up for the November issue of Canadian Journal of Economics, and I'll sketch out some of the main ideas here. Universities do two things. First, they produce knowledge. I say "knowledge" rather than "research" because some things that don't count as "research", such as blog...

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A gnomic theory of higher education

Here are the powerpoint slides (.pdf format) for my CEA Presidential Address "The Political Economy of University Education in Canada": DOWNLOAD WOOLLEY PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS SLIDES HERE.  The talk will be written up for the November issue of Canadian Journal of Economics, and I'll sketch out some of the main ideas here. Universities do two things. First, they produce knowledge. I say "knowledge" rather than "research" because some things that don't count as "research", such as blog...

Read More »