Thursday , March 4 2021
Home / Tag Archives: Equitablog

Tag Archives: Equitablog

Weekend reading: “barriers to economic equality” edition

This is a weekly post we publish on Fridays with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is the work we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context. Equitable Growth round-up Equitable Growth policy analyst Bridget Ansel gathered some of Equitable Growth’s past...

Read More »

Examining the links between rising wage inequality and the decline of unions

The correlation between unions and economic inequality is well-documented, but has the decline of unions led to increasing inequality, or can this be explained by skill-biased technical change? As Equitable Growth Economist Kate Bahn writes in a new column for Slate, new research published via the National Bureau of Economic Research finds that “while education and skills training matter to worker productivity, they’re not sufficient to ensure economic security without workers’ power to...

Read More »

Brad DeLong: Worthy reads on equitable growth, May 25-31, 2018

Worthy reads on Equitable Growth: Nick Bunker gathers scattered threads and sets out the issues on wage growth and unemployment in “Puzzling over U.S. wage growth.” As I say in a Value Added blog post, exactly the kind of debate we should be hosting and encouraging is by Jesse Rothstein: “Inequality of Educational Opportunity? Schools as Mediators of the Intergenerational Transmission of Income.” In the paper, he writes that “Chetty et al. (2014b) show that children from low-income...

Read More »

A look at the motherhood wage gap on Mother’s Equal Pay Day

Today is Mother’s Equal Pay Day, which marks how far into the year mothers in the United States have to work to earn what fathers earned in 2017. Equitable Growth writes a lot about this topic, and today we take a look back at some of our work analyzing the cause of the motherhood pay gap in the United States and abroad and the research on solutions that help mothers and families balance caregiving responsibilities with paid employment. “Mothers in the United States earn less despite...

Read More »

Rothstein challenges Chetty on whether education is the key to intergenerational mobility

Providing a platform for serious attempts to figure out what is going on in important policy areas relevant to equitable growth by promoting and challenging different interpretations is exactly the kind of thing the Washington Center for Equitable Growth should be doing. I want to highlight one telling case in point—Jesse Rothstein: “Inequality of Educational Opportunity? Schools as Mediators of the Intergenerational Transmission of Income.” Rothstein writes: Chetty et al. (2014b) show...

Read More »

Weekend reading, “market power” edition

This is a weekly post we publish on Fridays with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is the work we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context. Equitable Growth round-up Nathan Wilmers, a sociologist at Harvard University, writes about his latest research...

Read More »

Galbraithian economics: Countervailing power edition

It is John Kenneth Galbraith’s world. We simply live in it. I have always found it interesting that economists have worked so hard to pretend that we do not live in John Kenneth Galbraith’s world. Harvard University’s Andrei Shleifer once remarked to me that the collapse of Galbraith’s influence—that there were next to no “Galbraithians”—was a very interesting puzzle in the history of economic thought. But now there are some Galbraithians! In a new working paper released earlier this...

Read More »

Weekend reading: “household insecurity” edition

This is a weekly post we publish on Fridays with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is the work we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context. Equitable Growth round-up Household income in the United States has steadily become more volatile over the past...

Read More »

The extremely intelligent Martin Wolf reviews Maria Mazzucato. I blush to say that her book is still in THE PILE—I have not read it yet: Martin Wolf: Who creates a nation’s economic value?

The extremely intelligent Martin Wolf reviews Maria Mazzucato. I blush to say that her book is still in THE PILE—I have not read it yet: Martin Wolf: Who creates a nation’s economic value?: “Who creates value? Who extracts value? Who destroys value?… …If we mistake those who do the second or third for those who do the first, or mistake those who do the first for those who do the second or third, we will end up with impoverished and unhappy societies, in which plunderers rule. Many...

Read More »

How do we write regulations that constrain aggregators that want to hack our brain and attention and empower platforms that enable us to accomplish what we prudently judge our purposes to be when we are in our best selves?: Ben Thompson: Tech’s Two Philosophies

OK, Ben: how do we write regulations that constrain aggregators that want to hack our brain and attention and empower platforms that enable us to accomplish what we prudently judge our purposes to be when we are in our best selves? How was it that printing managed to, eventually, generate a less-unhealthy public sphere? Young Habermas, where are you now that we need you?: Ben Thompson: Tech’s Two Philosophies: “Apple and Microsoft, the two ‘bicycle of the mind” companies’… had broadly...

Read More »