Sunday , June 13 2021
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Tag Archives: crime

Complex needs

Closed borders ended tourism and left motel rooms empty. The government's booked out a fair few of those spaces as emergency social housing. But the whole thing seems a mess. Vulnerable people fleeing bad family situations are placed near rather dangerous types who also use social housing. Jane Patterson at RNZ has been tallying it up.Demand just keeps escalating, under a system where motels and other providers get paid on a weekly basis, or sometimes slightly longer, to house people in...

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24/7 Sobriety

A few stories this week reminded me of South Dakota's 24/7 Sobriety programme.There's concern about fewer offenders attending rehab programmes while in prison;Repeat drink driving remains a problem; even on-duty police seem to have the occasional problem. At least some very vulnerable people are being placed in emergency housing alongside "gang members, and people with drug and alcohol issues", with predicable negative outcomes. I've previously talked about South Dakota's 24/7 programme....

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When Police Kill

When Police Kill is the 2017 book by criminologist Franklin Zimring. Some insights from the book. Official data dramatically undercount the number of people killed by the police. Both the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Arrest-Related Deaths and the FBI’s Supplemental Homicide Reports estimated around 400-500 police kills a year, circa 2010. But the two series have shockingly low overlap–homicides counted in one series are not counted in the other and vice-versa. A statistical...

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More Pregnancy, Less Crime

When it comes to crime, economists focus on deterrence. Deterrence works but it’s not the only thing that works. Simple things like better street lighting can reduce crime as can high-quality early education or psychological interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy. The sociological literature has emphasized that crime is about preferences as well as constraints. Life-events or turning points such as marriage and childbirth, for example, can greatly change crime preferences....

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Morning roundup

This morning's worthies on the closing of the browser tabs:This one was a long time coming: difficulty in insuring apartments in Wellington (NBR, maybe $). I wonder whether parametric insurance paying out a sufficient amount in the event of a Mercalli VIII event would satisfy bank mortgage requirements. Stuff has a new data visualisation up that they're calling the Homicide Report. They introduce a particular innovation: car crashes involving alcohol use are counted as homicides. I fully...

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Police effects

Geoff Simmons makes some good points about overreliance on prisons, but I think he's got this part wrong: The Labour/NZ First answer of more police is also no real solution either. More police means more people in prison and we know more people in prison just leads to more crime. Empirical work on police numbers and crime is hard because of obvious endogeneity issues: police hiring is also a response to crime rates.But the best approach I've seen to the problem finds an elasticity of crime...

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Morning roundup

A few of the worthies as I close out the browser tabs before Chrome eats every last bit of my system's resources:Thomas Lumley's travel guide for Auckland visitors for a statistical computing conference may be useful beyond that conference's attendees. The Washington State Institute for Public Policy's evaluation of boot camps suggests that they're very effective. I had previously thought there was a typo in their tally: they had a negative cost listed for the things, which had me thinking...

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Opportunity and access: how legal work status affects immigrant crime rates

Immigrants in Italy represent less than 10 percent of the country’s population, but 34 percent of its people in prison. When taking a closer look at the immigrant prison population, it becomes apparent that the over-representation is attributed to irregular immigrants lacking legal work status. In fact, regular immigrants – those who have been granted a legal work permit – exhibit crime rates in line with those of the native population (Ministry of Interior, 2007). Identifying...

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The Economics of Crime

On September 28, the Economics Department at Haverford College will hold its annual alumni forum. The topic this year is "The Economics of Crime and Incarceration." Our panelists will beEric Sterling (Haverford class of '73), Executive Director of the Criminal Justice Policy Foundation, and Mark Kleiman (class of '72), Director of the Crime and Justice Program at New York University’s Marron Institute of Urban Management. In anticipation of the event, especially for any Haverford students...

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