Thursday , September 24 2020
Home / S. Sumner: Money Illusion / Trump’s new ambassador to Germany

Trump’s new ambassador to Germany

Summary:
Each day, Trump reaches new lows in depravity. His new ambassador to Germany is just one example: Like Trump, Macgregor has cast doubt on the NATO alliance, saying that we should withdraw our troops in Germany and make it clear “that we are not going to be the first responder” if allies are attacked by Russia. Also like Trump, Macgregor has a disquieting tendency to echo Vladimir Putin’s propaganda. While appearing on Russia’s state-owned RT, he justified the Russian invasion of Ukraine by falsely saying that eastern and southern Ukrainians are “clearly Russian” and “should be allowed to join Russia.” By contrast, he criticized the U.S. intervention to stop the ethnic cleansing of Muslims by “Orthodox Christian Serbs in Kosovo.” The claim that Russia has a right to

Topics:
Scott Sumner considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Menzie Chinn writes 13 Nobel Laureates in Economics on the Choice of President

Menzie Chinn writes President Trump’s Statement on the Occasion of Covid-19 Fatalities Exceeding 200,000

Tyler Cowen writes Gangs, Labor Mobility and Development

Tyler Cowen writes Tuesday assorted links

Each day, Trump reaches new lows in depravity. His new ambassador to Germany is just one example:

Like Trump, Macgregor has cast doubt on the NATO alliance, saying that we should withdraw our troops in Germany and make it clear “that we are not going to be the first responder” if allies are attacked by Russia. Also like Trump, Macgregor has a disquieting tendency to echo Vladimir Putin’s propaganda. While appearing on Russia’s state-owned RT, he justified the Russian invasion of Ukraine by falsely saying that eastern and southern Ukrainians are “clearly Russian” and “should be allowed to join Russia.” By contrast, he criticized the U.S. intervention to stop the ethnic cleansing of Muslims by “Orthodox Christian Serbs in Kosovo.”

The claim that Russia has a right to invade portions of a neighboring country inhabited by ethnic Russians is of course the exact same argument Hitler used for invading the Sudetenland. But then Macgregor thinks there’s way too much criticism of the Nazis:

Macgregor has also been an outspoken critic of Merkel’s government. He claims that Germany “seems more concerned about providing free services to millions of unwanted Muslim invaders, to be blunt, than it does about its own armed forces in the defense of its country.” He even thinks that Germany has gone too far in making penance for Nazi crimes: “There’s sort of a sick mentality that says that generations after generations must atone for the sins of what happened in 13 years of German history and ignore the other 1,500 years of Germany.”

It’s “sick” to teach young Germans that there are people still alive in your own country who participated in killing 6 million Jews, not to mention enormous numbers of Russians, Poles, Roma, etc? Perhaps he prefers the whitewashed history taught in Japan.

Prior to 1989, people trying to cross the border from East to West Germany were often shot and killed. Macgregor sees great merit in that sort of approach to border control:

He says that immigration from Mexico is our greatest national security threat and that Democrats are trying to “create demographic change that will make them the permanent power inside the borders of the United States.” He advocates that we declare martial law along the border and “shoot people” if necessary.

It’s well known that Trump is proud of his German heritage, and indeed views the Germans as a sort of superior race. I’m not sure what part of his German heritage he is most proud of, but it is certainly not the liberalism of Angela Merkel.

If Trump is still president 4 years from today then the US government will be so far down in the gutter that it will be almost unrecognizable.

Come on people; admit that I was right about Trump. Right from the beginning.


Tags:

 
 
 
Scott Sumner
Scott B. Sumner is Research Fellow at the Independent Institute, the Director of the Program on Monetary Policy at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and an economist who teaches at Bentley University in Waltham, Massachusetts. His economics blog, The Money Illusion, popularized the idea of nominal GDP targeting, which says that the Fed should target nominal GDP—i.e., real GDP growth plus the rate of inflation—to better "induce the correct level of business investment".

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *