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My hopeless dream that will never come true

Summary:
As the Democratic Party self destructs before our very eyes (as I predicted in this blog last year), I desperately grasp for straws, despite knowing in my heart that Trump will be President for 5 more years. Here’s my latest pathetic fantasy: Bill Clinton and Barack Obama go on national TV in a well publicized 1/2 hour TV special. They patiently explain why a self-professed socialist who honeymooned in the Soviet Union is not likely to be elected president in the world’s most capitalist country in the midst of an economic boom. That shouldn’t be too hard to do.  Especially because when Sanders was younger he said many many things that will allow the GOP to say he’s a communist, not just a socialist.  Do you think the GOP will fail to resurrect those quotes in campaign ads? In

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As the Democratic Party self destructs before our very eyes (as I predicted in this blog last year), I desperately grasp for straws, despite knowing in my heart that Trump will be President for 5 more years. Here’s my latest pathetic fantasy:

Bill Clinton and Barack Obama go on national TV in a well publicized 1/2 hour TV special. They patiently explain why a self-professed socialist who honeymooned in the Soviet Union is not likely to be elected president in the world’s most capitalist country in the midst of an economic boom. That shouldn’t be too hard to do.  Especially because when Sanders was younger he said many many things that will allow the GOP to say he’s a communist, not just a socialist.  Do you think the GOP will fail to resurrect those quotes in campaign ads?

In the forlorn hope that Dem voters are not totally brain dead, and still have a lingering affection for those two (successful and semi-successful) former presidents, maybe they listen.

Then the big surprise. They both announce they plan to endorse Al Gore, who will enter the race the next day. They call on all moderate candidates to drop out of the race for the good of the country.

Al Gore has lots of advantages over Sanders. First, he’s younger than Sanders, despite having run for president in 1988. Second he’s already won the majority of votes in a presidential election, against a far tougher candidate than Trump. Most importantly, he appeals to both centrists and the left. He was a centrist while in office, but moved left after leaving office—opposing the Iraq War and becoming a fanatical advocate of fighting climate change.

Sanders is such an awful candidate that I’d support almost any GOP nominee over Sanders, even someone as awful as Jeff Sessions or (gasp) Lindsey Graham. Indeed there’s only one Republican that would make me support Sanders.

My hopeless dream that will never come truePS.  Off topic, I saw this headline in the National Review:

Bloomberg’s China Apologetics Should Disqualify Him from the Presidency

I also hate Bloomberg, and don’t want him anywhere near the White House.  But does the conservative, pro-Republican National Review really want to say that a candidate is disqualified to be president if he praises a foreign dictator?

Just asking.

I expect 2020 will be like one of those Central American elections where voters get to choose between an authoritarian thug who praises military people that torture and murder, and a socialist who likes Cuba.

We’ve truly become a banana republic.


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Scott Sumner
Scott B. Sumner is Research Fellow at the Independent Institute, the Director of the Program on Monetary Policy at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and an economist who teaches at Bentley University in Waltham, Massachusetts. His economics blog, The Money Illusion, popularized the idea of nominal GDP targeting, which says that the Fed should target nominal GDP—i.e., real GDP growth plus the rate of inflation—to better "induce the correct level of business investment".

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