Friday , November 22 2019
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Trump wants a deal, but does China?

Summary:
How do I know that? Because Trump said so: President Donald Trump said in a Twitter post that he plans to meet with Liu on Friday, adding that it’s a “big day of negotiations with China. They want to make a deal, but do I?” Wait, isn’t that the exact opposite? Yes it is. But Trump always says the exact opposite of what’s true. A perfect phone call is a disastrous phone call. A traitor is a patriot. The man who respects women more than any guy other actually respects them less than any other guy. The wisest leader is the least wise.  I could go on and on. You have to know how to read Trump, then it’s as easy as reading the mood of a 4-year old child. Tags:

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How do I know that? Because Trump said so:

President Donald Trump said in a Twitter post that he plans to meet with Liu on Friday, adding that it’s a “big day of negotiations with China. They want to make a deal, but do I?”

Wait, isn’t that the exact opposite? Yes it is. But Trump always says the exact opposite of what’s true. A perfect phone call is a disastrous phone call. A traitor is a patriot. The man who respects women more than any guy other actually respects them less than any other guy. The wisest leader is the least wise.  I could go on and on.

You have to know how to read Trump, then it’s as easy as reading the mood of a 4-year old child.


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Scott Sumner
Scott B. Sumner is Research Fellow at the Independent Institute, the Director of the Program on Monetary Policy at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and an economist who teaches at Bentley University in Waltham, Massachusetts. His economics blog, The Money Illusion, popularized the idea of nominal GDP targeting, which says that the Fed should target nominal GDP—i.e., real GDP growth plus the rate of inflation—to better "induce the correct level of business investment".

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