Thursday , June 17 2021
Home / Project Syndicate / Stalin’s War and Peace

Stalin’s War and Peace

Summary:
In dealing with Vladimir Putin's Russia, the West has both underestimated and overestimated the country, often simultaneously. An examination of Soviet history – from World War II through the Nuremberg Trials – shows just how dangerous such miscalculations can be. Sean McMeekin, Stalin’s War: A New History of World War II, Allen Lane, London; Basic Books, New York, 2021.Jonathan Haslam, The Spectre of War: International Communism and the Origins of World War II, Princeton University Press, 2021.Norman M. Naimark, Stalin and the Fate of Europe: The Postwar Struggle for Sovereignty, Harvard University Press, 2019.Francine Hirsch, Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg: A New History of the International Military Tribunal after World War II,

Topics:
Nina L. Khrushcheva considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Yu Yongding writes China Needs Higher Inflation

Takatoshi Ito writes An Olympic-Size COVID Risk

Laura Alfers writes A Digital Bridge to Social Support

Zachary Karabell writes America’s Flawed Search for Itself

In dealing with Vladimir Putin's Russia, the West has both underestimated and overestimated the country, often simultaneously. An examination of Soviet history – from World War II through the Nuremberg Trials – shows just how dangerous such miscalculations can be.

MOSCOW – From the 2008 war in Georgia to the 2014 annexation of Crimea and the build-up of troops along Ukraine’s eastern and southern borders just this spring, Russia’s actions in recent years have been increasingly worrying. Could history – in particular, the behavior of Joseph Stalin’s Soviet Union after World War II – give Western leaders the insights they need to mitigate the threat?

The authors of several recent books about Stalin seem to think so. But not everyone gets the story right. Instead, modern observers often fall into the trap of reshaping history to fit prevailing ideological molds. This has fed an often-sensationalized narrative that is not only unhelpful, but that also plays into Russian President Vladimir Putin’s hands.

Nowhere is this more obvious than in the perception, popular in the West, that Putin is a strategic genius – always thinking several moves ahead. Somehow, Putin anticipates his Western foes’ tactical mistakes and is invariably well prepared to take advantage of them. As a result, he is not only one of the world’s most powerful autocrats, but...

Nina L. Khrushcheva
Nina L. Khrushcheva is a Professor of International Affairs and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at The New School and a senior fellow at the World Policy Institute. Khrushcheva received a degree from Moscow State University with a major in Russian in 1987 and a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Princeton University in 1998.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *