Saturday , April 10 2021
Home / Project Syndicate / A Just Climate Transition for Africa

A Just Climate Transition for Africa

Summary:
In 2021, developed countries must work with low-income, developing, and emerging economies to chart a path toward a low-carbon future – and clear barriers to progress. This means, first and foremost, delivering the funding they promised. ABUJA – From sweltering heatwaves to disrupted harvests, Nigerians are already feeling the effects of climate change, and the country’s fast-growing young population is working hard to develop innovative solutions to the escalating crisis. But climate change is not a challenge any country can tackle alone. The End of the Oil Age PS OnPoint David McNew/Getty Images The West’s Crisis of Academic

Topics:
Sharon Ikeazor considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Bradford DeLong writes DeLongTODAY: Inflation as the Principal Risk? I Do Not See It…

Miles Kimball writes James Wells on the Evolution of the Standard Model of Physics

Tyler Cowen writes New York City estimate of the day

Tyler Cowen writes From Charles Kenny

In 2021, developed countries must work with low-income, developing, and emerging economies to chart a path toward a low-carbon future – and clear barriers to progress. This means, first and foremost, delivering the funding they promised.

ABUJA – From sweltering heatwaves to disrupted harvests, Nigerians are already feeling the effects of climate change, and the country’s fast-growing young population is working hard to develop innovative solutions to the escalating crisis. But climate change is not a challenge any country can tackle alone.

African countries, in particular, should not have to try. After all, although Africa is among the world’s most vulnerable regions – recurring droughts in Sub-Saharan Africa have already caused the share of undernourished people in drought-prone countries to grow by 45.6% since 2012 – it bears the least responsibility for the problem.

Moreover, in Benin, Ivory Coast, Senegal, and Togo, rising sea levels and increasingly intense storms have eroded coastlines, imposing costs exceeding 5% of these countries’ combined GDP in 2017. As the effects of climate change disrupt societies and destroy livelihoods, conditions for conflict ripen, with destabilizing effects that are rippling across the region.

Meanwhile, the developed economies, which bear the lion’s share of responsibility for climate change, largely ignore what is happening in Africa,...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *