Sunday , April 11 2021
Home / Project Syndicate / Build Back Equal

Build Back Equal

Summary:
Creating an economy that works for everyone is not just a matter of empowering those who have been “left behind” by globalization. Instead, it requires a comprehensive and critical assessment of the systemic forces that are fueling inequality. QUITO – The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed and exacerbated a wide range of inequalities. If leaders are serious about “building back better,” policies to overcome the systemic forces that underlie them must form the heart of their agendas.One such divide is the gender gap. Since the pandemic began, women have suffered job losses at a higher rate than men – not least because they are overrepresented in many of the hardest-hit industries, such as food service and retail – and faced higher

Topics:
María Fernanda Espinosa considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Bradford DeLong writes DeLongTODAY: Inflation as the Principal Risk? I Do Not See It…

Miles Kimball writes James Wells on the Evolution of the Standard Model of Physics

Tyler Cowen writes New York City estimate of the day

Tyler Cowen writes From Charles Kenny

Creating an economy that works for everyone is not just a matter of empowering those who have been “left behind” by globalization. Instead, it requires a comprehensive and critical assessment of the systemic forces that are fueling inequality.

QUITO – The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed and exacerbated a wide range of inequalities. If leaders are serious about “building back better,” policies to overcome the systemic forces that underlie them must form the heart of their agendas.

One such divide is the gender gap. Since the pandemic began, women have suffered job losses at a higher rate than men – not least because they are overrepresented in many of the hardest-hit industries, such as food service and retail – and faced higher levels of social precarity and food insecurity. The pandemic is set to increase the gender gap in extreme poverty as well.

Moreover, as feminist thinkers like Silvia Federici have pointed out, the burden of domestic labor – already disproportionately borne by women – became far heavier during pandemic lockdowns. At the same time, women are usually the victims of domestic violence, which has become more frequent and severe since the pandemic began.

Not surprisingly, women’s mental health has suffered disproportionately over the last year. The burden of the pandemic has been particularly heavy for women who are also subject to other forms of marginalization, based on race, age, or immigration status.

More broadly, the pandemic has expanded the divide between rich and poor. A handful of billionaires have seen their wealth skyrocket over the last year, while lower-skill workers have faced far larger

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *