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Deciding Humanity’s Future

Summary:
By announcing shared climate and biodiversity targets for 2030, G7 leaders this month made a promising step in the right direction, setting the stage for further progress at major global summits later this year. Still, what we really need is a fundamental change in our relationship with the planet. STOCKHOLM – At the recent G7 summit in Cornwall, Sir David Attenborough described the decisions currently facing the world’s richest countries as “the most important in human history.” He is right. The summit was held against a backdrop of crises, including the pandemic, climate change, biodiversity loss, rising inequality, and an “infodemic” of misinformation. The Gaps in Bidenomics

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By announcing shared climate and biodiversity targets for 2030, G7 leaders this month made a promising step in the right direction, setting the stage for further progress at major global summits later this year. Still, what we really need is a fundamental change in our relationship with the planet.

STOCKHOLM – At the recent G7 summit in Cornwall, Sir David Attenborough described the decisions currently facing the world’s richest countries as “the most important in human history.” He is right. The summit was held against a backdrop of crises, including the pandemic, climate change, biodiversity loss, rising inequality, and an “infodemic” of misinformation.

These challenges have made this a decisive decade for global action. While we welcome the G7’s new commitment to halve carbon dioxide emissions and become “nature positive” by reversing biodiversity loss all by 2030, these steps represent the minimum of what is required from the wealthiest countries on Earth.

As 126 Nobel Prize laureates note in a recent

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