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How to Support Developing Countries in Energy Transition

Summary:
Despite the severity of the climate-change crisis, much of the debate in advanced economies is entirely inward-looking, without recognizing that the real growth in carbon dioxide emissions is coming from emerging Asia. In fact, Asia already accounts for a higher share of global emissions than the United States and Europe combined. CAMBRIDGE – Barring the discovery of a substance like vibranium (the fictional metal in the Marvel Comics universe that can absorb and release large amounts of kinetic energy), the earth is set to experience a sharp rise in global temperatures by the end of this century. Given the severity of the crisis, it is remarkable how much of the debate in advanced economies is entirely

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Despite the severity of the climate-change crisis, much of the debate in advanced economies is entirely inward-looking, without recognizing that the real growth in carbon dioxide emissions is coming from emerging Asia. In fact, Asia already accounts for a higher share of global emissions than the United States and Europe combined.

CAMBRIDGE – Barring the discovery of a substance like vibranium (the fictional metal in the Marvel Comics universe that can absorb and release large amounts of kinetic energy), the earth is set to experience a sharp rise in global temperatures by the end of this century. Given the severity of the crisis, it is remarkable how much of the debate in advanced economies is entirely inward-looking, without recognizing that the real growth in carbon dioxide emissions is coming from emerging Asia. In fact, Asia already accounts for a higher share of global emissions than the United States and Europe combined.

Yes, there are many options for trying to reduce CO2 emissions. Many economists (including me) favor a global carbon tax, though some argue that the more politically digestible cap-and-trade...

Kenneth Rogoff
Thomas D Cabot Professor of Public Policy, Harvard University, former chief economist IMF, International Grandmaster of Chess, Latest book: The Curse of Cash

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