Sunday , September 15 2019
Home / Offsetting Behaviour / Dining out as cultural trade

Dining out as cultural trade

Summary:
Joel Waldfogel combines TripAdvisor data with gravity models of trade to figure out which cuisines reign supreme. Perceptions of Anglo-American dominance in movie and music trade motivate restrictions on cultural trade. Yet, the market for another cultural good, food at restaurants, is roughly ten times larger than the markets for music and film. Using TripAdvisor data on restaurant cuisines, along with Euromonitor data on overall and fast-food expenditure, this paper calculates implicit trade patterns in global cuisines for 52 destination countries. We obtain four results. First, the pattern of cuisine trade resembles the “gravity” patterns in physically traded products. Second, after accounting gravity factors, the most popular cuisines are Italian, Japanese, Chinese, Indian, and

Topics:
Eric Crampton considers the following as important: , ,

This could be interesting, too:

Simon Wren-lewis writes Will we get No Deal because Brexiters want it more?

Menzie Chinn writes Born in the U.S.A.

Simon Wren-lewis writes Is Brexit a culture war or a class war?

Menzie Chinn writes “Seattle’s Chinese American veterans to receive long overdue honor from U.S.”

Joel Waldfogel combines TripAdvisor data with gravity models of trade to figure out which cuisines reign supreme.
Perceptions of Anglo-American dominance in movie and music trade motivate restrictions on cultural trade. Yet, the market for another cultural good, food at restaurants, is roughly ten times larger than the markets for music and film. Using TripAdvisor data on restaurant cuisines, along with Euromonitor data on overall and fast-food expenditure, this paper calculates implicit trade patterns in global cuisines for 52 destination countries. We obtain four results. First, the pattern of cuisine trade resembles the “gravity” patterns in physically traded products. Second, after accounting gravity factors, the most popular cuisines are Italian, Japanese, Chinese, Indian, and American. Third, excluding fast food, the largest net exporters of their cuisines are the Italians and the Japanese, while the largest net importers are the USA—with a 2015 deficit of over $140 billion—followed by Brazil, China, and the UK. With fast food included, the US deficit shrinks to $55 billion but remains the largest net importer along with China and, to a lesser extent, the UK and Brazil. Fourth, cuisine trade patterns more closely resemble migration patterns than patterns of food trade or patterns arising from the extent of arable land in origin countries. Cuisine trade patterns run starkly counter to the audiovisual patterns that have motivated concern about Anglo-American cultural dominance.
The Economist does a prettier version of Waldfogel's tables:

Dining out as cultural trade

The paper finds that migration matters, reinforcing my view that New Zealand needs to provide immigration preference to migrants from countries whose cuisines are underrepresented in New Zealand. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *