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Price discriminating against brides seems profitable

Summary:
The wedding industry is notorious for sticking it to brides.   But whether this is due to price discrimination or higher costs (brides can be demanding) is still a matter of debate.  But here is an example that seems clear: As I wrote in the column, part of the reason that retailers can get away with charging higher prices for wedding-related services is that spouses-to-be probably have stronger preferences for their “special day” than consumers shopping for other kinds of events do. That means they’re less price-sensitive. In the case of gowns, for example, brides probably have much more specific requirements for their own dresses than for the dresses that their bridesmaids will wear, allowing retailers to charge different prices for each, regardless of what material or labor

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The wedding industry is notorious for sticking it to brides.   But whether this is due to price discrimination or higher costs (brides can be demanding) is still a matter of debate.  But here is an example that seems clear:

As I wrote in the column, part of the reason that retailers can get away with charging higher prices for wedding-related services is that spouses-to-be probably have stronger preferences for their “special day” than consumers shopping for other kinds of events do. That means they’re less price-sensitive. In the case of gowns, for example, brides probably have much more specific requirements for their own dresses than for the dresses that their bridesmaids will wear, allowing retailers to charge different prices for each, regardless of what material or labor costs go into the respective frocks.

I classify this as direct price discrimination because retailers identify the bride, set separate prices, and prevent arbitrage.  

HT:  JC

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