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Map: The Most Common Language in Each State Other Than English and Spanish

Summary:
2. French is the most commonly spoken language at home other than English and Spanish in 6 states. Estimated number of speakers nationally: 1,184,736 States where it’s the most commonly spoken language at home other than English and Spanish: Louisiana, North Carolina, Maryland, Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire Most of us know about New Amsterdam and New England, but New France (or Nouvelle-France) lasted from the early 17th century until around 1803. That year, President Thomas Jefferson bought up the last of France’s western territory bordering the US from Napoleon Bonaparte, doubling the country overnight in what became known as the Louisiana Purchase. Before that, however, Louisiana and its biggest city, New Orleans, had a French

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2. French is the most commonly spoken language at home other than English and Spanish in 6 states.

Estimated number of speakers nationally: 1,184,736

States where it’s the most commonly spoken language at home other than English and Spanish: Louisiana, North Carolina, Maryland, Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire

Most of us know about New Amsterdam and New England, but New France (or Nouvelle-France) lasted from the early 17th century until around 1803.

That year, President Thomas Jefferson bought up the last of France’s western territory bordering the US from Napoleon Bonaparte, doubling the country overnight in what became known as the Louisiana Purchase.

Before that, however, Louisiana and its biggest city, New Orleans, had a French government, followed French customs, and spoke French. The language evolved over the 17th and 18th centuries from its original form, creating Louisiana French, or Louisiana Creole, a combination of French, English, Spanish, Native American, and African words. To this day, it’s still spoken by around 175,000 people in Louisiana and Texas.

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Miles Kimball
Miles Kimball is Professor of Economics and Survey Research at the University of Michigan. Politically, Miles is an independent who grew up in an apolitical family. He holds many strong opinions—open to revision in response to cogent arguments—that do not line up neatly with either the Republican or Democratic Party.

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