Tuesday , May 21 2019
Home / Miles Kimball / Paul Serusier’s ‘Talisman’ of Modern Art

Paul Serusier’s ‘Talisman’ of Modern Art

Summary:
In her Wall Street Journal article, “A Mythic Moment in Modern Painting,” Mary Tompkins Lewis writes:When Sérusier presented the panel at the Académie Julian in Paris, his peers were stunned and immediately pronounced it “Le Talisman,” as it precipitated the approach they would adopt thereafter in their work. These young artists, including Pierre Bonnard and Edouard Vuillard, would become known, along with Denis and Sérusier, as the “Nabis” (from the Hebrew term for “prophets”) and truly saw themselves as heralds of a fundamentally new kind of art. They formed a secret fraternity organized around esoteric rituals and proclamations, and

Topics:
Miles Kimball considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Bradford DeLong writes Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality 2019-05-21 02:56:46

Bradford DeLong writes Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality 2019-05-21 02:52:21

Bradford DeLong writes Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality 2019-05-21 02:27:27

Bradford DeLong writes Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality 2019-05-21 02:25:11

‘Landscape at the Bois d’Amour’ or ‘Le Talisman’ (1888), by Paul Sérusier     Link to the Wall Street Journal article on this painting by Mary Tompkins Lewis

In her Wall Street Journal article, “A Mythic Moment in Modern Painting,” Mary Tompkins Lewis writes:

When Sérusier presented the panel at the Académie Julian in Paris, his peers were stunned and immediately pronounced it “Le Talisman,” as it precipitated the approach they would adopt thereafter in their work. These young artists, including Pierre Bonnard and Edouard Vuillard, would become known, along with Denis and Sérusier, as the “Nabis” (from the Hebrew term for “prophets”) and truly saw themselves as heralds of a fundamentally new kind of art. They formed a secret fraternity organized around esoteric rituals and proclamations, and initiated a collective artistic movement across a variety of media that was marked by its powerful aesthetic unity. The tiny panel, which hung on a wall of the Paris meeting place they christened “The Temple,” was never exhibited, but preserved as an artifact of their origins.

Miles Kimball
Miles Kimball is Professor of Economics and Survey Research at the University of Michigan. Politically, Miles is an independent who grew up in an apolitical family. He holds many strong opinions—open to revision in response to cogent arguments—that do not line up neatly with either the Republican or Democratic Party.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *