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Sharing the wealth, or at least the compensation

Summary:
Twitter econ asked for my historical ECI series, so here you go. See tab “finaltbl.” For columns B and C–pvt industry–I do a small splice re older data which you can track through the spreadsheet. For cols D & E–these are “all civilian” and are the series we use for our wage mashup–I don’t bother splicing. I doesn’t really make a difference as splice factor is tiny for toplines (they matter more for industries). Now, in return, I want gobs of twitter love and a wage series to be named later. Share the post "Sharing the wealth, or at least the compensation"

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Twitter econ asked for my historical ECI series, so here you go. See tab “finaltbl.” For columns B and C–pvt industry–I do a small splice re older data which you can track through the spreadsheet. For cols D & E–these are “all civilian” and are the series we use for our wage mashup–I don’t bother splicing. I doesn’t really make a difference as splice factor is tiny for toplines (they matter more for industries).

Now, in return, I want gobs of twitter love and a wage series to be named later.

Jared Bernstein
Jared Bernstein joined the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in May 2011 as a Senior Fellow. From 2009 to 2011, Bernstein was the Chief Economist and Economic Adviser to Vice President Joe Biden, Executive Director of the White House Task Force on the Middle Class, and a member of President Obama’s economic team. Prior to joining the Obama administration, Bernstein was a senior economist and the director of the Living Standards Program at the Economic Policy Institute, and between 1995 and 1996, he held the post of Deputy Chief Economist at the U.S. Department of Labor.

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