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Links and a musical interlude from the Professor

Summary:
First, here’s a post at WaPo wherein I point out that as long as new tax revenues remain off the table, then we’re implicitly agreeing to ever-higher deficits and debt. Here’s another one on how we shouldn’t let the prevailing fiscal dynamics tie us up in knots. And, far better than the above, here’s Professor Longhair telling the fabled tale of poor old Junco Partner, a dude who drank a bit too much and ended “wobblin’ all over the street.” Share the post "Links and a musical interlude from the Professor"

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First, here’s a post at WaPo wherein I point out that as long as new tax revenues remain off the table, then we’re implicitly agreeing to ever-higher deficits and debt.

Here’s another one on how we shouldn’t let the prevailing fiscal dynamics tie us up in knots.

And, far better than the above, here’s Professor Longhair telling the fabled tale of poor old Junco Partner, a dude who drank a bit too much and ended “wobblin’ all over the street.”

Jared Bernstein
Jared Bernstein joined the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in May 2011 as a Senior Fellow. From 2009 to 2011, Bernstein was the Chief Economist and Economic Adviser to Vice President Joe Biden, Executive Director of the White House Task Force on the Middle Class, and a member of President Obama’s economic team. Prior to joining the Obama administration, Bernstein was a senior economist and the director of the Living Standards Program at the Economic Policy Institute, and between 1995 and 1996, he held the post of Deputy Chief Economist at the U.S. Department of Labor.

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