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We’re wired to discount the future. That’s uniquely problematic in our system.

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Over at WaPo. The R’s attack on regulation writ large is clearly underway and is a profound threat. We can and should fight this on a case-by-case basis–Dodd-Frank, fiduciary rule, climate–but it’s equally important to puzzle out the thematics of why this is such an effective play for them. Share the post "We’re wired to discount the future. That’s uniquely problematic in our system."

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Over at WaPo.

The R’s attack on regulation writ large is clearly underway and is a profound threat. We can and should fight this on a case-by-case basis–Dodd-Frank, fiduciary rule, climate–but it’s equally important to puzzle out the thematics of why this is such an effective play for them.

Jared Bernstein
Jared Bernstein joined the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in May 2011 as a Senior Fellow. From 2009 to 2011, Bernstein was the Chief Economist and Economic Adviser to Vice President Joe Biden, Executive Director of the White House Task Force on the Middle Class, and a member of President Obama’s economic team. Prior to joining the Obama administration, Bernstein was a senior economist and the director of the Living Standards Program at the Economic Policy Institute, and between 1995 and 1996, he held the post of Deputy Chief Economist at the U.S. Department of Labor.

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