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Further reading

Summary:
Elsewhere on Tuesday, – The London Whale resurfaces: Bruno Iksil speaks out. And from the last par:Iksil is writing a book about the affair. He has written at least three drafts. The latest includes his allegations that senior executives at JP Morgan should take more of the blame for the losses. He has no publishing contract. “I’ve been waiting now for [almost five] years,” he says. “I think it’s time to say the things. The truth has to be told.”– Brookings: Credit rating reform is incomplete.– European buyout firms head for the exit.– From Noaphinion: “But as important as the border adjustment is, it might not be the most significant change in the tax reform plan. The House plan would also fundamentally change the way that U.S. corporations finance themselves, wreaking huge changes in

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Elsewhere on Tuesday,

– The London Whale resurfaces: Bruno Iksil speaks out. And from the last par:

Iksil is writing a book about the affair. He has written at least three drafts. The latest includes his allegations that senior executives at JP Morgan should take more of the blame for the losses. He has no publishing contract. “I’ve been waiting now for [almost five] years,” he says. “I think it’s time to say the things. The truth has to be told.”

Brookings: Credit rating reform is incomplete.

– European buyout firms head for the exit.

From Noaphinion: “But as important as the border adjustment is, it might not be the most significant change in the tax reform plan. The House plan would also fundamentally change the way that U.S. corporations finance themselves, wreaking huge changes in U.S. financial markets in the process”

– Setser on Puerto Rico’s daunting fiscal math.

A Bloomberg longread: Bolivia’s desperate miners are doing desperate things, like murder.

Meanwhile at Brigdewater following an internal investigation led by… James Comey: “Videos of the interrogations were edited and later rolled out in a serialized fashion, a Bridgewater version of a reality TV show, said the former employees, who saw them.”

Covenant Review enjoys the limelight.

– Everything you wanted to know about bond workouts but were afraid to ask.

– Here’s what happens to endowments when colleges close.

– Cambridge Analytica, promise vs reality.

– Free speech, safe spaces and the ‘right’ to deny platforms.

Mary Beard: Women in power.

– Inside the TalkTalk ‘Indian scam call centre’.

– Does your dream retirement include margaritas and live music? Jimmy Buffett has a place for you.

“Theft! A History of Music, a graphic novel laying out a 2000 year long history of musical borrowing from Plato to rap.”

“For decades, she seldom talked about the 007 film and her status as one of Asia’s first Bond girls (along with her Japanese co-star Akiko Wakabayashi). But now, as “You Only Live Twice” turns 50, she has become more willing to reflect on her bittersweet moment of global stardom, and her decision to discard that in search of something more authentic and personal.”

– “The most likely time for people to turn into trolls? Sunday and Monday nights, from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m.”

– Requiem for a Dil.

– Further, further reading.

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David Keohane
(Spending some time as FTAV’s Bombay wallah. Noticeably sweatier but not much else has changed.) David studied economics, politics and journalism before joining the FT in 2011 as a Marjorie Deane fellow. He covered emerging markets, equities and currencies before making the jump over to FT Alphaville in May 2012. In between his degree and masters he wandered into the real world of business where he learnt how to manipulate a spreadsheet and organise meetings where nothing gets decided.