Saturday , March 25 2017
Home / FT Alphaville / FT Opening Quote: Stumble at Sainsbury’s

FT Opening Quote: Stumble at Sainsbury’s

Summary:
Stumble at Sainsbury’s, Balfour’s back and Saatchi means Saatchi. FT Opening Quote, with commentary by Matthew Vincent, is your early Square Mile briefing. You can sign up for the full newsletter here. J Sainsbury’s chairman was left a little red faced last month, after being reprimanded for roping in staff and suppliers to renovate his East Sussex outbuildings. But the supermarket might have wished David Tyler had bought more Red Leicester and Blue Nun for the ensuing barn dance / outhouse-warming cheese and wine party. This morning’s trading update showed total retail sales grew only 0.1 per cent in the nine weeks to 11 March – and actually fell 0.5 per cent on a like-for-like basis.Sainsbury’s put this down to the later dates of Easter and Mothers’ Day this year. But the sales

Topics:
Siona Jenkins considers the following as important: ,

This could be interesting, too:

David Keohane writes Snap AV: Goldman calls peak cash

David Keohane writes For the brave China SOE reform optimists out there

Siona Jenkins writes FT Opening Quote: Sterling boost for Smiths Group

David Keohane writes Further reading

Stumble at Sainsbury’s, Balfour’s back and Saatchi means Saatchi. FT Opening Quote, with commentary by Matthew Vincent, is your early Square Mile briefing. You can sign up for the full newsletter here.

J Sainsbury’s chairman was left a little red faced last month, after being reprimanded for roping in staff and suppliers to renovate his East Sussex outbuildings. But the supermarket might have wished David Tyler had bought more Red Leicester and Blue Nun for the ensuing barn dance / outhouse-warming cheese and wine party. This morning’s trading update showed total retail sales grew only 0.1 per cent in the nine weeks to 11 March – and actually fell 0.5 per cent on a like-for-like basis.

Sainsbury’s put this down to the later dates of Easter and Mothers’ Day this year. But the sales performance was still slightly worse than recent data from Kantar Worldpanel had indicated: it suggested that Sainsbury’s sales had risen by 0.3 per cent over 12 weeks to 26th February – and that was still slower than the sales growth at almost every other large UK supermarket chain.

Strip out the ‘later dates’ effect and this maintains a mildly positive trend, though. Like for like sales in the 15 weeks to January 7 were 0.1 per cent higher than a year earlier, having fallen in the six months to the end of September.

At least there was no need for Mr Tyler to boost sales of electrical goods or clothes, however, as non food continued its strong performance.

Catalogue retailer Argos recorded total sales growth of 3.8 per cent and like-for-like sales were up 4.3 per cent – beating expectations. Clothes sales were also ahead of the market, with the Tu clothing brand recording five per cent growth.

Over Christmas, group performance had been carried by non-food: clothing posted a 10 per cent increase while catalogue store Argos posted a 4 per cent increase in like-for-like sales, including growth of about 25 per cent in its supermarket concessions open more than a year.

Chief executive Mike Coupe said:

The market remains very competitive and the impact of cost price pressures remains uncertain. However, we are well placed to navigate the external environment and remain focused on delivering our strategy.

For a construction company, one would hope that the slogan “Build To Last” represented general everyday practice, rather than some kind of remarkable change in strategy. But such have been the woes at Balfour Beatty that the group felt it necessary to adorn its 2015 transformation programme with this statement of the bleeding obvious.

Coming after a torrid two years, in which Balfour issue a string of profit warnings and fought off a takeover attempt, the remedial work seems to be paying off at last. Last August, the company said pre-tax losses fell 86 per cent to £21m for the half year to July 1 on revenues down marginally from £4.2bn a year earlier. It even reinstated its dividend.

And this morning, it reported that it had returned to profit in the full year to December 31, turning a statutory pre-tax loss of nearly £200m into to a profit of £8m.

Its order book grew by 4 per cent at constant exchange rates, to stand at £12.7bn, although the currency effect meant underlying revenue dipped 3 per cent to £8.5bn.

Even so, chief executive used that word again, calling it a “transformation”.

Having simplified the Group, we are focused on our core markets in the UK and US, where governments are committed to large scale expenditure on infrastructure, he said. All this positions us for future profitable growth.

Now the tricky questions surround its pension deficit – which grew to £231m in aggregate from £146m- and whether it plans to try and win work constructing President Donald Trump’s controversial wall along the US-Mexico border.

M&C Saatchi worked on the Remain advertising campaign in the EU referendum – but the agency has managed to emerge as one of the few winners from that side of the argument: like for like revenue rose 19 per cent last year to $196m and pre-tax profit improved 18 per cent to £23.7m. However, pre-tax profits fell by half because of restructuring charges.

Unlike many remoaners, chief executive David Kershaw seems to have put June 23 behind him.

2016 was an outstanding year for M&C Saatchi. We continue to roll out our proven strategy of winning new business and starting new businesses and see positive momentum across our global network and business channels.

Brexit means Brexit!

For commentary on Sports Direct’s pay ratio, a Falkland Islands bidding battle and BNP Paribas buying a UK estate agent, see this morning’s Lombard column.

Beyond the Square Mile

Asian markets were up slightly in Thursday trading. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index climbed 1.4 per cent as energy stocks jumped 2.7 per cent and telecoms stocks rose 1.8 per cent. Tokyo’s benchmark Topix index was up 0.1 per cent, while in Sydney, the S&P/ASX 200 index was flat headed into the close.

In the US, the S&P 500 ended 0.8 per cent higher at 2,385. The move left the benchmark index just 0.4 per cent below the record closing high it reached at the start of this month.

Dutch populists suffered a defeat in yesterday’s closely watched election in the Netherlands. Early results show that Prime Minister Mark Rutte is on course for a clear win over far-right populist candidate Geert Wilders. Moderates. Pro-EU politicians across Europe are heaving a sigh of relief.

The dollar index — measuring the currency against a basket of peers — was down another 0.2 per cent on top of Wednesday’s fall of 0.9 per cent to put it at 100.66, its lowest in a month.

The pound was 0.2 per cent softer at $1.2268 after ending the previous session 1.1 per cent higher. It was back above the $1.22 mark for the first time in just over a week.

Oil prices built further on Wednesday’s gains. Brent crude, the international benchmark, rose 0.6 per cent to $52.13 a barrel, back above $52 for the first time since Friday and erasing losses from earlier in the week. West Texas Intermediate, the US marker, rose the same amount to $49.14, which combined with Wednesday’s 2.4 per cent rise put it above its Monday open.

Gold edged up another 0.4 per cent to $1,225.04 per ounce, taking it 2.2 per cent higher over two days.

Intraday

In the US, index futures suggest the S&P 500 will gain another 1.5 points to 2,386.7, when trading gets under way later in New York.

Corporate earnings reports out today include Lufthansa, Generali, Sainsbury and Oxford Biomedica.

The economic calendar for Thursday is as follows (all times London):

08.30: Sweden unemployment rate
09.00: Norway’s Norges Bank interest rates decision
10.00: Eurozone consumer price inflation (second reading)
11.00: Turkey interest rates decision
12.00: Bank of England interest rates decision, QE target, meeting minutes.

The markets at 07:58

Asian markets
Nikkei 225 up +12.76 (+0.07%) at 19,590
Topix up +1.38 (+0.09%) at 1,573
Hang Seng up +439.50 (+1.85%) at 24,232

US markets
S&P 500 up +19.81 (+0.84%) at 2,385
DJIA up +112.73 (+0.54%) at 20,950
Nasdaq up +43.23 (+0.74%) at 5,900

European markets
Eurofirst 300 up +5.84 (+0.40%) at 1,478
FTSE100 up +10.79 (+0.15%) at 7,369
CAC 40 up +11.22 (+0.23%) at 4,985
Dax up +21.08 (+0.18%) at 12,010

Currencies
€/$ 1.07 (1.07)
$/¥ 113.31 (113.35)
£/$ 1.23 (1.23)
€/£ 0.8734 (0.873)

Commodities ($)
Brent Crude (ICE) up +0.51 at 52.32
Light Crude (Nymex) up +0.70 at 49.56
100 Oz Gold (Comex) up +24.10 at 1,224
Copper (Comex) unchanged 0.00 at 2.65

10-year government bond yields (%)
US 2.49%
Germany 0.40%

CDS (closing levels)
Markit iTraxx SovX Western Europe -0.07bps at 17.83bp
Markit iTraxx Europe -1.71bps at 72.27bp
Markit iTraxx Xover -6bps at 284.38bp
Markit CDX IG -2.64bps at 63.04bp

Sources: FT, Bloomberg, Markit

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2017. All rights reserved. You may share using our article tools. Please don't cut articles from FT.com and redistribute by email or post to the web.
0 0
Siona Jenkins
Former Cairene; FT Middle east news editor. Views my own.