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FirstFT – Trump unshackled, Cambridge university issues first bond and why millennials are switching off social media

Summary:
Sign up to receive FirstFT by email hereDonald Trump signalled on Tuesday that he would revert to the bare-knuckled campaigning that won him the Republican nomination, setting up the final month of the race to be the nastiest yet.A day after House speaker Paul Ryan abandoned Mr Trump’s campaign, the Republican nominee sent out a series of tweets lambasting his party’s most senior official as “weak and ineffective”, and said that he was now free to go after Democratic rival Hillary Clinton “unshackled” by party restraint.“It is so nice that the shackles have been taken off me and I can now fight for America the way I want to,” he declared in a flurry of messages. “Disloyal [Republicans] are far more difficult than Crooked Hillary. They come at you from all sides. They don’t know how

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Donald Trump signalled on Tuesday that he would revert to the bare-knuckled campaigning that won him the Republican nomination, setting up the final month of the race to be the nastiest yet.

A day after House speaker Paul Ryan abandoned Mr Trump’s campaign, the Republican nominee sent out a series of tweets lambasting his party’s most senior official as “weak and ineffective”, and said that he was now free to go after Democratic rival Hillary Clinton “unshackled” by party restraint.

“It is so nice that the shackles have been taken off me and I can now fight for America the way I want to,” he declared in a flurry of messages. “Disloyal [Republicans] are far more difficult than Crooked Hillary. They come at you from all sides. They don’t know how to win — I will teach them!”

The divisions inside the Republican party spilled out into the open after Mr Ryan told party leaders that he would no longer defend Mr Trump or campaign on his behalf. As many as 160 prominent Republicans, including John McCain, have declared that they will not support Mr Trump’s bid for the presidency. (FT)

In the news

Putin calls off Paris visit The Russian president cancelled a trip to the French capital after François Hollande strongly criticised Moscow’s role in the bombing campaign in Syria. The row between the two nations had been brewing since the weekend, when Russia vetoed a France-led UN resolution to end bombings on Aleppo. (FT)

Samsung feels the heat The company on Tuesday said it would kill the beleaguered Galaxy Note 7 in a decision that threatens not only its share price and reputation but also its standing as the world’s largest phonemaker. Potential losses could wipe out the mobile division’s operating profits for the entire quarter. (FT)

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Death toll in Ethiopia exceeds 500 The prime minister has admitted more than 500 people may have been killed over the course of 11 months of anti-government protests. While acknowledging the political system needed reform, Hailemariam Desalegn warned that “extremist violent groups” would be dealt with forcefully. (FT)

China and Russia close ranks against US Chinese and Russian defence officials on Tuesday blasted Washington’s plans to deploy a missile defence system in Asia and Europe, saying it would prompt a new arms race. A Chinese general said deployments in South Korea would jeopardise regional stability, while a Russian officer said they were presumptuous and arrogant. (SCMP)

It’s a big day for

Brexit The Labour party is set to challenge the government in the House of Commons to provide more details on its strategy for Brexit and submit a list of 170 allegedly unanswered questions on its plans. (FT)

Food for thought

Theresa May’s hard lesson on sovereignty Unwise words have consequences. The UK government’s extreme goals are now clear, writes Martin Wolf. “Investors have duly marked down the value of the country’s assets in the simplest way, by selling the pound.” (FT)

More millennials switch off social media Fatigue with Facebook and Twitter oversharing has left many reaching for basic phones. (FT)

Xi Jinping’s third term Speculation is growing that Xi Jinping will defy China’s rule on leadership retirement, in what would be the biggest test yet of his authority over the Communist party. He will be 69 at the expiry of his second term in 2022 and some say he’s hinted at seeking a third. (FT)

Crash: how computers are setting us up for disaster We increasingly let computers fly planes and carry out security checks. Driverless cars are next. But is our reliance on automation dangerously diminishing our skills? (The Guardian)

To wash or not to wash Scientists are split on how much and when handwashing will protect health. Epidemiologist Tim Spector gives some sensible advice. (The Conversation)

The smartphone saviour Tristan Harris believes Silicon Valley is addicting us to our phones. And he is out to fix things. (The Atlantic)

Video of the day

White House is Clinton’s to take What impact has the Trump tape made? How critical will congressional races be? FT editor Lionel Barber talks to chief US commentator Ed Luce and Companies editor Brooke Masters. (FT)

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Bryan Harris
Bryan Harris is a lead writer at Financial Times. He is a Hong Kong-based journalist with a penchant for international crime stories.