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Current Account Deficits and Safe Assets

Summary:
The International Monetary Fund has issued its External Sector Report for 2017, and among its key findings: “Global current account imbalances were broadly unchanged in 2016…” The U,S. continues to record the largest deficit, 1.7 billion, which is equal in value to 2.4% of U.S. GDP. The continuing deficits contribute to the increase in the ...

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The International Monetary Fund has issued its External Sector Report for 2017, and among its key findings: “Global current account imbalances were broadly unchanged in 2016…” The U,S. continues to record the largest deficit, $451.7 billion, which is equal in value to 2.4% of U.S. GDP. The continuing deficits contribute to the increase in the […]
Joseph P. Joyce
M. Margaret Ball Professor of International Relations, Professor of Economics. My research deals with issues in financial globalization: Are capital flows consistent with financial stability? Why are financial markets volatile? What are the causes of financial crises? I teach courses in international macroeconomics, the economics of globalization, financial markets and macroeconomic theory.

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