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Massive Wildfires in the West: Who Could’ve Guessed?

Summary:
Sixteen years ago, the G.W. Bush White House suppressed for four years this report on global climate change impacts, which discussed, among other things, the increased prevalence of wildfires. This was discussed in this post, entitled “What the Administration Considered Too Dangerous to Release for Four Years”. And released only under threat of a court order: “Scientific Assessment of the Effects of Global Change on the United States” (summary). From Reuters: NEW YORK (Reuters) – The Bush administration released a climate change assessment on Thursday — four years late and pushed forward by a court order — that said human-induced global warming will likely lead to problems like droughts in the U.S. West and stronger hurricanes. … This is an encouraging development for those who believe

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Sixteen years ago, the G.W. Bush White House suppressed for four years this report on global climate change impacts, which discussed, among other things, the increased prevalence of wildfires. This was discussed in this post, entitled “What the Administration Considered Too Dangerous to Release for Four Years”.

And released only under threat of a court order: “Scientific Assessment of the Effects of Global Change on the United States” (summary).

Massive Wildfires in the West: Who Could’ve Guessed?

From Reuters:

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The Bush administration released a climate change assessment on Thursday — four years late and pushed forward by a court order — that said human-induced global warming will likely lead to problems like droughts in the U.S. West and stronger hurricanes.

This is an encouraging development for those who believe knowledge-based policymaking is a good idea. Some day, I might even see this White House admit that mercury is toxic, and we are not on the right hand side of the Laffer Curve. But one day at a time.

Here’s the entire report (large PDF). [this link is non-operational – MDC]

The still-operational link to the report is here.

Just a reminder that the anti-science faction has dominated the Republican party for a very long time…I just couldn’t have imagined how much worse the anti-science tendencies would become.

Menzie Chinn
He is Professor of Public Affairs and Economics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison

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