Friday , April 26 2019
Home / Econbrowser - James Hamilton / Random Sunday Observation on the Compositional Attributes of the Econoblogosphere

Random Sunday Observation on the Compositional Attributes of the Econoblogosphere

Summary:
The economics blogosphere, as listed in several lists of “top blogs” is remarkably monochromatic, and male. If one types in the words “top economics blogs” into Google, one gets several lists: Intelligent Economist, 2018FocusEconomics, 2018American Library AssnI would’ve liked to do a tabulation and present a formal breakdown. However, the day job prevents me from devoting too much time; nonetheless, a cursory examination/count yields the following (unsurprising) insights: (1) minorities are under-represented in the typical list, and (2) females are under-represented — in both cases relative to the general population. I suspect also relative to the population of economists (defined as those who have an economics/public policy degree, or publish on the subject). (A count is hard to do

Topics:
Menzie Chinn considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Tyler Cowen writes Gender and the confidence gap

Tyler Cowen writes Thursday assorted links

Tyler Cowen writes Wednesday assorted links

Tyler Cowen writes My Conversation with Margaret Atwood

The economics blogosphere, as listed in several lists of “top blogs” is remarkably monochromatic, and male.

If one types in the words “top economics blogs” into Google, one gets several lists:

I would’ve liked to do a tabulation and present a formal breakdown. However, the day job prevents me from devoting too much time; nonetheless, a cursory examination/count yields the following (unsurprising) insights: (1) minorities are under-represented in the typical list, and (2) females are under-represented — in both cases relative to the general population. I suspect also relative to the population of economists (defined as those who have an economics/public policy degree, or publish on the subject). (A count is hard to do partly because some blogs have many contributors, so my characterizations focus on blogs with 5 or fewer main contributors).

If I look at the Intelligent Economist list, of the 25 blogs in macro+micro, there’s only one woman, and only 1/2 asians (well, 1/2 minorities, total) — and that’s me! Now, academic and policy macro (ex.-open economy macro) has historically been pretty male/white, but this ratio seems (even taking into account small sample issues) a little out of whack.

My rough count for Focus Economics’ list of all 101 blogs (general, macro, financial, etc.) is something on the order of 5 minorities and 4.5 females (I’m dropping Bruegel, OECD, etc., which are many-authored portals).

For me, the interesting question is not why this under-representation occurs (although that surely is of interest, and I have theories), but rather how the composition of bloggers tends to affect the types of debates that occur, and the assumptions that are made and taken for granted as appropriate.

For instance, are minorities and women less sanguine about the ability of prices to clear markets ridden by asymmetric information? Do immigrants view domestic labor and migrant labor more as complements than substitutes?

Some things to ponder as you read through your go-to blogs.

Menzie Chinn
He is Professor of Public Affairs and Economics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *