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Fourth National Climate Assessment

Summary:
Despite the Trump Administration’s best attempts to bury this report, you should read it. Some people will dismiss the output of a government interagency report. The National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine Review notes: The Committee was impressed by the accuracy of information and thorough discussion of the predominant aspects of climate change and impacts presented in the draft NCA4. The 1,506-page draft report provides a strong foundation of climate science and a solid discussion of climate change impacts occurring or likely to occur in the United States. The topics are wellselected and logically organized around key messages. The introduction of new national topic and regional chapters since the Third National Climate Assessment (NCA3) is a welcome addition and

Topics:
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Despite the Trump Administration’s best attempts to bury this report, you should read it.

Some people will dismiss the output of a government interagency report. The National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine Review notes:

The Committee was impressed by the accuracy of information and thorough discussion of the predominant aspects of climate change and impacts presented in the draft NCA4. The 1,506-page draft report provides a strong foundation of climate science and a solid discussion of climate change impacts occurring or likely to occur in the United States. The topics are wellselected and logically organized around key messages. The introduction of new national topic and regional chapters since the Third National Climate Assessment (NCA3) is a welcome addition and improves the comprehensiveness of the assessment. The new national topic chapter, “Sectoral Interdependencies, Multiple Stressors, and Complex Systems” is an excellent addition because it facilitates discussion of the inherent challenges introduced by climate change in interlinked systems. …

Menzie Chinn
He is Professor of Public Affairs and Economics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison

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