Friday , June 5 2020
Home / David Flynn: Barter is Evil / Morning brief: Oil Jawboning, Cellphone data for social distancing

Morning brief: Oil Jawboning, Cellphone data for social distancing

by
David
My articles My books
Follow on:
Summary:
A family member’s word-a-day calendar yesterday was “jawboning” and that was apparently what the President was doing related to oil markets and Russia and Saudi Arabia (New York Times link). I will not say that is not a surprise, nor that it is unwarranted. What remains to be seen is if it works. In the past some Presidents could get away with such an announcement and force the desired outcome, but that does not seem to be the world we live in right now. I am a bit skeptical of some of the data coming out about cell phone use and social distancing (see this story). In particular when you look at the situation with states like North Dakota I do not think there is adequate consideration of changes in behavior, nor the underlying population density at the start. In addition,

Topics:
David considers the following as important: , ,

This could be interesting, too:

Tyler Cowen writes The return to studying economics is fairly high

David writes Legislative Acts v. Executive Orders

Tyler Cowen writes My excellent Conversation with Ashley Mears

Tyler Cowen writes Is this why budget deficits might prove sustainable?

A family member’s word-a-day calendar yesterday was “jawboning” and that was apparently what the President was doing related to oil markets and Russia and Saudi Arabia (New York Times link). I will not say that is not a surprise, nor that it is unwarranted. What remains to be seen is if it works. In the past some Presidents could get away with such an announcement and force the desired outcome, but that does not seem to be the world we live in right now.

I am a bit skeptical of some of the data coming out about cell phone use and social distancing (see this story). In particular when you look at the situation with states like North Dakota I do not think there is adequate consideration of changes in behavior, nor the underlying population density at the start. In addition, when based on miles traveled for example it clearly fails to recognize the standard distance traveled for such simple tasks as groceries. I think these data have an ability to call to light the issue of food deserts in urban and rural areas and perhaps start a discussion about a policy response.

About David

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *