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Predicting the State of the Union Impacts

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Summary:
I am teaching forecasting this semester and trying to show the students that forecasting is also a thought process and a state mind. So I thought some predictions about sectors impacted by the State of the Union speech would be a good exercise. I pick three sectors likely to be impacted: agriculture, energy, and construction. Why these three? I think the President will discuss progress made on international trade negotiations with China. This will include significant exports for agricultural production in the US. This will be a large gain for agricultural producers. I think there will be a continued discussion of energy independence and likely a mention of the Permian Basin in Texas, though there will be gains for ND shale producers as a result. This is likely to take the

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I am teaching forecasting this semester and trying to show the students that forecasting is also a thought process and a state mind. So I thought some predictions about sectors impacted by the State of the Union speech would be a good exercise. I pick three sectors likely to be impacted: agriculture, energy, and construction. Why these three?

I think the President will discuss progress made on international trade negotiations with China. This will include significant exports for agricultural production in the US. This will be a large gain for agricultural producers.

I think there will be a continued discussion of energy independence and likely a mention of the Permian Basin in Texas, though there will be gains for ND shale producers as a result. This is likely to take the form of regulatory changes (at least hinted at if not fully fleshed out).

Then there will be discussion of wall building and infrastructure spending. These items will benefit the construction industry and provide significant employment boosts and spending.

It should not be lost on readers that these three sectors all have significant importance in North Dakota and if policies are put into place in a reasonably clear and efficient fashion the state as a whole should stand to benefit quite significantly.

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