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Texas A & M economists study cheating (and how much might not depend on being rich or poor)

Summary:
Study: Richer or poorer, cheaters cheat by Lynn Brezosky of The San Antonio Express-News. If people don't cheat as much as they could possibly get away with, does it mean they are not always following their self-interest? Excerpts: "Are people more likely to cheat when times are tough? A team of behavioral economists from Texas A&M University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute on New York traveled to a remote village in Guatemala to answer that question. What they found surprised them: while most people cheat a little, people who cheat more do so regardless of whether they're richer or poorer. In another finding, people gave more to strangers in another village when times were bad for everyone, indicating people are more empathetic in times of scarcity." "“Economists

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Study: Richer or poorer, cheaters cheat by Lynn Brezosky of The San Antonio Express-News. If people don't cheat as much as they could possibly get away with, does it mean they are not always following their self-interest? Excerpts:
"Are people more likely to cheat when times are tough?

A team of behavioral economists from Texas A&M University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute on New York traveled to a remote village in Guatemala to answer that question.

What they found surprised them: while most people cheat a little, people who cheat more do so regardless of whether they're richer or poorer.

In another finding, people gave more to strangers in another village when times were bad for everyone, indicating people are more empathetic in times of scarcity."

"“Economists get really surprised when they find out either that people do not cheat or they do not cheat to the full extent, especially when the potential cost of cheating is very, very low,” RPI behavioral economist Billur Aksoy said. “Because what we say is that if the cost of doing something is less than the benefit of doing it, you should always do it.”"

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