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CBO: GDP Falls 7%, Unemployment Hits 10% in Second Quarter 2020

Summary:
Phillip Swagel, Director of the Congressional Budget Office, blogs on "Updating CBO’s Economic Forecast to Account for the Pandemic" (April 2, 2020) The following are CBO’s very preliminary estimates, which are based on information about the economy that was available through this morning and which include the effects of an economic boost from recently enacted legislation. Gross domestic product is expected to decline by more than 7 percent during the second quarter. If that happened, the decline in the annualized growth rate reported by the Bureau of Economic Analysis would be about four times larger and would exceed 28 percent. Those declines could be much larger, however. The unemployment rate is expected to exceed 10 percent during the second quarter, in part reflecting the 3.3

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Phillip Swagel, Director of the Congressional Budget Office, blogs on "Updating CBO’s Economic Forecast to Account for the Pandemic" (April 2, 2020)
The following are CBO’s very preliminary estimates, which are based on information about the economy that was available through this morning and which include the effects of an economic boost from recently enacted legislation.
Gross domestic product is expected to decline by more than 7 percent during the second quarter. If that happened, the decline in the annualized growth rate reported by the Bureau of Economic Analysis would be about four times larger and would exceed 28 percent. Those declines could be much larger, however.
The unemployment rate is expected to exceed 10 percent during the second quarter, in part reflecting the 3.3 million new unemployment insurance claims reported on March 26 and the 6.6 million new claims reported this morning. (The number of new claims was about 10 times larger this morning than it had been in any single week during the recession from 2007 to 2009.)

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