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Neuromyths about the Brain and Learning

Summary:
"Neuromyths are false beliefs, often associated with education and learning, that stem from misconceptions or misunderstandings about brain function. Over the past decade, there has been an increasing amount of research worldwide on neuromyths in education." The Online Learning Consortium has published an International report: Neuromyths and evidence-based practices in higher education. by the team of Kristen Betts, Michelle Miller,  Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Patricia A. Shewokis, Alida Anderson,  Cynthia Borja,  Tamara Galoyan,  Brian Delaney,  John D. Eigenauer, and Sanne Dekker.  They draw on previous surveys and information about "neuromyths" to construct their own online survey, which was sent to people inn higher education The response rate was low, as is common with online

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"Neuromyths are false beliefs, often associated with education and learning, that stem from misconceptions or misunderstandings about brain function. Over the past decade, there has been an increasing amount of research worldwide on neuromyths in education." The Online Learning Consortium has published an International report: Neuromyths and evidence-based practices in higher education. by the team of Kristen Betts, Michelle Miller,  Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa,
Patricia A. Shewokis, Alida Anderson,  Cynthia Borja,  Tamara Galoyan,  Brian Delaney, 
John D. Eigenauer, and Sanne Dekker. 

They draw on previous surveys and information about "neuromyths" to construct their own online survey, which was sent to people inn higher education The response rate was low, as is common with online surveys, so consider yourself warned. But what's interesting to me is to read the "neuromyths" and to consider your own susceptibility to them. More details at the report itself, of course.
Neuromyths about the Brain and Learning

Neuromyths about the Brain and Learning

Neuromyths about the Brain and Learning
Homage to Bill Goffe for spotting this report. 

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