Monday , July 6 2020
Home / Worthwhile Canadian Initiative (page 10)

Worthwhile Canadian Initiative

The Worthwhile Canadian Initiative blog is a self proclaimed “mainly Canadian economics blog”. Written by a group of intelligent economists, this blog is filled with top quality posts ranging from health, finance and inequality.

Are the returns to university education falling?

[Updated to fix coding errors in some of my graphs Prices are determined by supply and demand. The supply of university-educated Canadians, relative to the supply of college or high school graduates, is increasing. University participation rates have been climbing for decades (Source: CAUT): Canada's points based immigration system, which prioritizes those with valuable skills, further increases the supply of highly educated Canadians. Unless the demand for university graduates rises...

Read More »

Are the returns to university education falling?

Prices are determined by supply and demand. The supply of university-educated Canadians, relative to the supply of college or high school graduates, is increasing. University participation rates have been climbing for decades (Source: CAUT): Canada's points based immigration system, which prioritizes those with valuable skills, further increases the supply of highly educated Canadians. Unless the demand for university graduates rises along with the supply, ECON 1000 reasoning suggests...

Read More »

Natural Resources, Living Standards and Inequality

Kevin Milligan had an op-ed in the Globe and Mail a few days ago drawing the link between natural resource development, middle class incomes and inequality.  The point essentially was: “Without income derived from the resource boom, Canadian inequality and the well-being of the Canadian middle class would be much worse than we’ve experienced.”  The point was being made with reference to the current pipeline debate and the consequences of erecting barriers to the transportation of...

Read More »

In the war between generations, will universities get caught in the cross-fire?

Canada's baby boomers are now in their late 50s and 60s. They're done with university. Their kids, for the most part, are done with university. Sure, at some point the boomers' grandchildren might want a university education, but that is not an immediate or pressing concern. More urgent, from the baby boomer's point of view, are policies that benefit them directly, such as good health care, or tax/benefit policies that leave them with more money their pockets at the end of the day. This...

Read More »

Site Maintenance

Site Maintenance Sorry for the inconvenience but we’re performing some maintenance at the moment. We’ll be back online shortly! You've requested a page on a website (worthwhile.typepad.com) that is on the Cloudflare network. Cloudflare is currently unable to resolve your requested domain (worthwhile.typepad.com). Ray ID: 40cb706205cd97f2 Timestamp: 2018-04-17 02:25:04 UTC Your IP address: 88.99.241.248 Requested URL:...

Read More »

“Trickle Down”, “Magic Dirt”, memes and deep parameters

"Trickle Down Theory" is a meme used (mostly by non-economists) to ridicule certain economic policies and the theories on which those policies are supposedly based. My first year students sometimes ask me to explain it to them, not understanding that it's a meme and not a theory. "Magic Dirt Theory" is a similar meme, of more recent (and "deplorable") origin (a quick search tells me it's from Vox Day/Supreme Dark Lord). But ideas, including memes, should be evaluated on their merits. Here...

Read More »

The evolving gender gap in student satisfaction

For 30 years, Canada's National Graduates Survey (NGS) has asking college and university graduates, "If you could choose again, would you select the same field of study or specialization that you completed?" As I explain here, the precise wording of the "would you do it again" question has changed over time, as has the placement of the question on the survey, the way graduates are categorized into "university" and "college" students, and how long after graduation the NGS is administered....

Read More »

Do students choosing liberal arts degrees regret it?

One way to measure students' satisfaction with their educational experience is to ask graduates, if they could choose again, would they select the same program. Canada's National Graduates Survey (NGS) has been asking some variation on that question since 1982. The data has many limitations, as I explain in this post. But the little we can find out from readily-available data tells us this: most graduates, when asked, would select the same field of study again again, but graduates of some...

Read More »

The National Graduates Survey, student satisfaction, and the politics of statistics

One way to measure students' satisfaction with their educational experiences is to ask graduates, if they could choose again, if they would select the same program. Canada's National Graduates Survey (NGS) has been asking some variation on that question since 1982. The questions asked, and the percentage of students saying that they would select the same field of study again, are shown in the table below. Although the NGS includes both college and university graduates, for ease of...

Read More »

It’s time to blunt dentists’ incentives to use general anesthetics

I recently consulted a dentist about getting a tooth extracted. The dentist recommended getting it done under general anesthetic. I responded, "I've had four wisdom tooth extracted under local anesthetic. I've given birth to two children without medication. I think I can handle it." "Ah, but some patients say dental pain is worse than child birth." Eventually the dentist agreed to extract the tooth under a local anesthetic, and I was presented with an estimate for procedure - $350. "Why...

Read More »