Friday , July 3 2020
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The author Tyler Cowen
Tyler Cowen
Tyler Cowen is an American economist, academic, and writer. He occupies the Holbert C. Harris Chair of economics as a professor at George Mason University and is co-author, with Alex Tabarrok, of the popular economics blog Marginal Revolution. Cowen and Tabarrok have also ventured into online education by starting Marginal Revolution University. He currently writes the "Economic Scene" column for the New York Times, and he also writes for such publications as The New Republic, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Newsweek, and the Wilson Quarterly.

T. Cowen: Marginal Revolution

New evidence that amino acid mutations matter for contagiousness

It seems the virus mutated in Europe and became significantly more contagious (though not more dangerous per unit dose): The Spike D614G amino acid change is caused by an A-to-G nucleotide mutation at position 23,403 in the Wuhan reference strain; it was the only site identified in our first Spike variation analysis in early March that met our threshold criterion. At that time, the G614 form was rare globally, but gaining prominence in Europe, and GISAID was also tracking the clade carrying...

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Thursday assorted links

1. A massive star has disappeared without a trace. 2. The Roy and Paul Romer WSJ “keep our schools open and test” ad.  Yet the CDC recommends against entry testing for higher education, see these Bergstrom tweets.  Deeply irresponsible. 3. The culture that was Finland — until now! 4. Alabama students are throwing Covid parties. 5. British plan to become a science superpower. 6. What are the proper standards for informed consent in photographing protests? 7. Baz Luhrmann to...

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Cornell understands the equilibrium

They are reopening campus for the coming semester and here is one reason why: …the finding from Cornell researchers that holding the semester online potentially could result in more infections and more hospitalizations among students and staff members than holding the semester in person would. A study by Cornell researchers concluded that with nominal parameters, an in-person semester would result in 3.6 percent of the campus population (1,254 people) becoming infected, and...

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My Conversation with Annie Duke

Here is the transcript and audio, here is the opening summary: Annie joined Tyler to explore how payoffs aren’t always monetary, the benefits and costs of probabilistic thinking, the “magical thinking” behind why people buy fire insurance but usually don’t get prenups, the psychology behind betting on shark migrations, how her most famous linguistics paper took on Steven Pinker, how public policy would change if only the top 500 poker players voted, why she wasn’t surprised to lose Celebrity...

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Why American lockdown exceptionalism?

That is the topic of my latest Bloomberg column, and here is part of the explanation: The danger lies in the potential for ratchet effects. If hardly anyone is eating out or going to bars, you might be able to endure the deprivation. But once others have started doing something, you will probably feel compelled to join them, even at greater risk to your life. Consider that in the 1920s, the chance of catching a disease or infection from dining out was pretty high, but people still went out....

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Wednesday assorted links

1. The debate culture that is Charles Plott. 2. If you read these arguments in some other context, you might almost think higher education does not deserve all of the massive subsidies it receives (NYT). 3. Beware the average treatment effect. 4. California accuses Cisco of job discrimination based on Indian employee’s caste. 5. Further results on T-cell immunity. 6. U.S. buying up Remdesivir stock from Gilead. The post Wednesday assorted links appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

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When Police Kill

When Police Kill is the 2017 book by criminologist Franklin Zimring. Some insights from the book. Official data dramatically undercount the number of people killed by the police. Both the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Arrest-Related Deaths and the FBI’s Supplemental Homicide Reports estimated around 400-500 police kills a year, circa 2010. But the two series have shockingly low overlap–homicides counted in one series are not counted in the other and vice-versa. A statistical...

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China update of the day

Chinese authorities are carrying out forced sterilisations of women in an apparent campaign to curb the growth of ethnic minority populations in the western Xinjiang region, according to research published on Monday. The report, based on a combination of official regional data, policy documents and interviews with ethnic minority women, has prompted an international group of lawmakers to call for a United Nations investigation into China’s policies in the region. The move is likely to enrage...

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SARS-CoV-2 T-cell epitopes define heterologous and COVID-19-induced T-cell recognition

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic calls for the rapid development of diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic approaches. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity is central for control of and protection from viral infections[1-3]. A prerequisite to characterize T-cell immunity, but also for the development of vaccines and immunotherapies, is the identification of the exact viral T-cell epitopes presented on human leukocyte antigens (HLA)[2-8]. This is the first work identifying and characterizing...

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