Tuesday , January 18 2022
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The author Tyler Cowen
Tyler Cowen
Tyler Cowen is an American economist, academic, and writer. He occupies the Holbert C. Harris Chair of economics as a professor at George Mason University and is co-author, with Alex Tabarrok, of the popular economics blog Marginal Revolution. Cowen and Tabarrok have also ventured into online education by starting Marginal Revolution University. He currently writes the "Economic Scene" column for the New York Times, and he also writes for such publications as The New Republic, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Newsweek, and the Wilson Quarterly.

T. Cowen: Marginal Revolution

TikTok returns

TikTok stars are dancing their way to the bank. Some are making more than America’s top chief executives. Charli D’Amelio, who started posting videos of herself dancing on TikTok in 2019, brought in $17.5 million last year, according to Forbes, which recently ranked the highest-earning TikTok stars of 2021. With 133 million followers on TikTok, she makes her money from a clothing line and promoting products in TikTok videos and other ads. By comparison, median pay for chief executives of...

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Friday assorted links

1. David Brooks on America falling apart (NYT). 2. Jonah Goldberg is right.  And Megan McArdle is right. 3. Shawn Bradley’s life is tough. 4. “Likewise, authors from the same PhD program or who previously worked with the reviewer are significantly more likely to receive a positive evaluation. We also find that sharing “signals” of ability, such as publishing in “top five”, attending a high ranked PhD program, or being employed by a similarly ranked economics department...

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Who has been loneliest during the pandemic?

That question is the topic of my latest Bloomberg column.  The wealthy can fly to the sun, meet outdoors, test regularly, and find many other workarounds.  Poorer individuals tend to be working together in public-facing service jobs.  That has a Covid downside, but it does make them less lonely.  So who are the biggest loneliness losers? …it’s pointless to debate which group is loneliest. Still, I might argue for some sympathy for Northerners in midlevel jobs who work alone or...

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*The Voltage Effect*

From the excellent John List, the subtitle is How to Make Good Ideas Great and Great Ideas Scale. The post *The Voltage Effect* appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.         CommentsThis may be a very good book. I just wish they wouldn’t ... by QbertIn reply to RAD. My godchild will be entering the U of C in ... by raywardIn reply to JWatts. You are of course right about watt being ... by PersonallyIn reply to RAD. They are both pretty bad by...

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The reader requests of Celestus

I’ll break this into parts, and put my answer after each query: 1) I’m a remote worker. Why should I live in a city? Heck, why should I live in a suburb, or anywhere that has a state income tax? Even if I want “city amenities” why bother with NYC or SF or anywhere else that is built around the local job market? Why don’t I live in Puerto Rico and skirt income tax entirely? You live in a city for culture, for sex, and to marry well.  If those don’t apply...

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Thursday assorted links

1. In Austin, Caplan and Razib Khan will comment on Hanania.  I am telling them to put it on YouTube. 2. Pushing Zambia to become a start-up hub? 3. Can software identify your chess-playing style? 4. Support for the child tax credit is waning (NYT). 5. Western Arkansas is offering 10k in Bitcoin and bike to relocate there. 6. Why are so many defectors from North Korea to South Korea women? 7. Bruno M. on Apichatpong Weerasethakul. The post Thursday assorted links appeared first on...

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The gender equality paradox seems to hold for chess

The gender-equality paradox refers to the puzzling finding that societies with more gender equality demonstrate larger gender differences across a range of phenomena, most notably in the proportion of women who pursue degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math. The present investigation demonstrates across two different measures of gender equality that this paradox extends to chess participation (N = 803,485 across 160 countries; age range: 3–100 years), specifically that women...

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The Abundance Agenda

Excellent piece by Derek Thompson: America has too much venting and not enough inventing. We say that we want to save the planet from climate change—but in practice, many Americans are basically dead set against the clean-energy revolution, with even liberal states shutting down zero-carbon nuclear plants and protesting solar-power projects. We say that housing is a human right—but our richest cities have made it excruciatingly difficult to build new houses, infrastructure, or megaprojects....

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My Conversation with Ana Vidović

She is one of the world’s leading classical guitarists.  Here is the transcript and audio, here is part of the CWT summary: She joined Tyler to discuss that transition from prodigy to touring musician and more, including how Bach challenges her to become a better musician, the most difficult piece in guitar repertoire, the composers she wish had written for classical guitar, the Beatles songs she’d most like to transcribe, why it’s important to study a score before touching the guitar,...

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What are good long-term investments in your health?

Stuart asks: 1) what do you think are good long-term investments in your health? I know you’re a teetotaler and non-smoker, what about exercise? where do returns start not making sense? I do not think I am the expert you should consult, but I can tell you where my knowledge base comes from.  I have endured a lifetime of people with very exact ideas about health maximization, but with a paucity of data or carefully controlled studies.  I thus tend to be skeptical of very specific advice.  At...

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