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Paul Krugman
Paul Robin Krugman (born February 28, 1953) is an American economist, Distinguished Professor of Economics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and an op-ed columnist for The New York Times. In 2008, Krugman won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to New Trade Theory and New Economic Geography.

Paul Krugman

Seminar in Applied Economics: Why did the trade war fail?

The Economics Program at The Graduate Center, CUNY presents “Why did the trade war fail?” by Nobel Laureate Paul Krugman. This series of seminars is a chance for the Economics Program to present a variety of research to students, faculty, and the general public. In this presentation, Professor Krugman explains his research and understanding of the trade war and answers questions from students and participants on how he foresees the future may play out. Please do not miss our...

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Wonking Out: Economic Nationalism, Biden-Style

If you’re under 50, you probably don’t remember when Japan was going to take over the world. But in the late 1980s and early 1990s, many people were obsessed with Japan’s economic success and feared American decline. The supposedly nonfiction sections of airport bookstores were filled with volumes featuring samurai warriors on their covers, promising to teach you the secrets of Japanese management. Michael Crichton had a best-selling novel, “Rising Sun,” about the looming threat of Japanese...

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Why Won’t Republicans Rebuild America?

On June 26, 1956, Congress approved the Interstate Highway Act. Dwight Eisenhower signed the bill three days later. The legislation allocated $24.8 billion in federal funds for a down payment on the construction of an interstate highway system. That’s not a lot of money by current standards, but prices are far higher now than they were then, and the economy is vastly bigger. Measured as a share of gross domestic product, the act was the equivalent of around $1.2 trillion today. And the...

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Yellen’s New Alliance Against Leprechauns

Over the weekend, largely at the urging of Janet Yellen, the Treasury secretary, finance ministers from the Group of 7 — the major advanced economies — agreed to set a minimum 15 percent tax rate on the profits of foreign subsidiaries of multinational corporations. You may wonder what that’s about, or why you should care. So let me tell you about Apple and the leprechauns.Apple Inc. has vast global reach. Its products are sold almost everywhere; it has subsidiaries in a number of countries....

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Another DISASTEROUS Biden Jobs Report Leaves Liberal Economist Paul Krugman Doing Mental Gymnastics

💵https://www.kucoin.com/ucenter/signup?rcode=2MfQaNs 🤙🏾 Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/blackconservativeperspective 👊Paypal: https://paypal.me/GregoryForeman?locale.x=en_US 🏃‍♂️Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/gforemanBCP @gforemanBCP 💼 My Start Up: https://oshyhome.com https://www.igmchicago.org/surveys/unemployment-benefits/ U.S. employers added fewer than expected jobs last month as extended unemployment benefits encouraged workers to stay home. Employers added 559,000...

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Krugman Wonks Out: Do Hiring Headaches Imply a Labor Shortage?

This article is a wonky edition of Paul Krugman’s free newsletter. You can sign up here to receive it. Don’t pay too much attention to today’s jobs report; it came in slightly below expectations, but given the noisiness of the data (and the extent to which the numbers are often revised), it told us very little that we didn’t already know.The truth is that two things are clear about the U.S. economy right now. It’s growing very fast, and adding jobs at a rapid clip; but the pace of job...

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Can the Rich Pay for a Better America?

The budget proposal released by the Biden administration last week calls for almost $5 trillion in new spending over the next decade — that is, outlays in excess of its “baseline” estimate of the spending that would take place without new policies. Some of the extra money would be borrowed, but most of it — $3.6 trillion — is supposed to come from new revenues. President Biden has, however, repeatedly promised not to increase taxes on households making less than $400,000 a year. And his...

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What Joe Biden’s Proposed Budget Gets Right

Many reports about the Biden administration’s budget proposal, released Friday, convey the sense that it’s huge. President Biden, scream some of the headlines, wants to spend SIX TRILLION DOLLARS next year. (Sorry, can’t help doing my best Dr. Evil imitation.) It takes some digging to learn that the baseline — the amount the administration estimates we’d spend next fiscal year without new policies — is $5.7 trillion. In fact, one of the most striking things about Biden’s budget initiative —...

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Krugman Asks: Does the U.S. Dollar’s Dominance Really Matter?

This article is a wonky edition of Paul Krugman’s free newsletter. You can sign up here to receive it. Cryptocurrency was supposed to replace government-issued fiat currency in our daily lives. It hasn’t. But one thing I’m still hearing from the faithful is that Bitcoin, or Ethereum, or maybe some crypto asset introduced by the Chinese, will soon replace the dollar as the global currency of choice.That’s also very unlikely to happen, since it’s very hard for a currency to function as global...

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The Economy’s Post-Covid Recovery Is Just Getting Started

You’re driving to an appointment, but you’re running late, and you’re stuck at a red light. Being a law-abiding citizen, you won’t run the light, but you floor the gas pedal the second it changes. And for a sickening instant — maybe because the pavement is a bit wet — your tires spin uselessly before they gain traction and your car lurches forward.You say that this has never happened to you? Yeah, right. Anyway, wheelspin is a common phenomenon, and usually harmless. A few minutes after...

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