Friday , December 6 2019
Home / FT Alphaville

FT Alphaville

Was Ronaldo worth more than €100m? 

© AP Footballers usually don’t manage to secure nine-figure transfer fees to top-level clubs at the age of 33. But Cristiano Ronaldo isn’t your usual footballer. Not only is the player — who switched from Real Madrid to Juventus in the summer of 2018 for a whopping €100m (plus additional costs of another €12m) — one of the best ever to play the beautiful game, he is also a fantastic brand. His Instagram account has 191m followers. And as Jamie pointed out a few weeks ago, high...

Read More »

‘thank u, next’: how dating apps are transforming relationships

© Bloomberg Daniel McMurtrie and Alex Draime are co-founders of Tyro Capital Management, a hedge fund based in New York City. In this guest post, they argue that online dating apps have radically transformed the relationship market, with several cultural consequences for both sexes.The dating market has radically changed in the past two decades. Couples are marrying later and divorcing less. It is now common to live with a partner before marriage when it wasn’t before. And young men...

Read More »

Is Germany blocking nuclear because of gas? 

© Bloomberg This is a guest post by Rauli Partanen, an author, analyst and communicator on climate change, environment and energy systems. Partanen co-founded and leads Think Atom, a non-profit think tank advocating nuclear energy alternatives. In this post he argues Germany’s interests in natural gas are jeopardising the European Taxonomy for sustainable investments by scapegoating nuclear. Europe’s taxonomy for sustainable activities is meant to make sustainable investment easier,...

Read More »

Further reading 

Elsewhere on Wednesday, -- Muddy Waters’ next big move.-- Boris to face TV’s toughest interviewers.-- Are EY’s clients “special”?-- Macron alone.-- Face-mapping. -- Trump against the diplomats.-- Kamala out.-- Coming soon: WeWork the movie.-- Childbirth and crime....

Read More »

Snap AV: the spooz reigns supreme

This guy is long cheap EM energy stonks. © Getty Images/iStockphoto If you spend your day trawling company filings, economic data and shipping patterns in the hope of beating the market, avert your eyes now: That’s from Andrew Lapthorne at SocGen, who is feeling pretty dismal about the prospects for today’s stock picking generation:Once in a while we create a chart that is truly depressing. The chart below measures the percentage of global developed and emerging market stocks that...

Read More »

Is the fintech bubble bursting?

This year, it has felt like hardly a week has passed without some fintech declaring nonchalantly that it’s raised another few hundred million pounds. On Monday, it was the turn of a little-known (to us anyway) start-up called Hastee, which gives employees access to their pay as they earn it. It announced that it had raised £208m in its latest funding round.Challenger bank Revolut, meanwhile, is in the process of trying to raise $500m in equity and $1bn via a convertible loan from investors,...

Read More »

Further reading

Elsewhere on Tuesday...-- Was Russia behind the NHS leak?-- A Credit Suisse banker and the question of $2bn-- Post-Soviet crypto boom-- The man loosening bank regulation-- Kitsch, and neoliberals-- Google’s political ad loophole-- Economists and prison rape-- Why the Trump base won’t budge-- A normal democracy-- Song of the day: Yo La Tengo -- Let’s Save Tony Orlando’s House...

Read More »

The myth of crowding out

If you’ve had the misfortune of having to learn economics, you may remember the theory of the “crowding out effect” from your studies.Popularised in the 1970s, the idea is that an increase public sector investment, and therefore borrowing, has the rather undesirable effect of displacing the private sector’s planned borrowing and investment. For instance if the government decided to fund a $10bn “broadband for all” policy via the bond market, interest rates may rise due to a larger fiscal...

Read More »

What level of reserves is truly “excessive”?

As our FT colleagues wrote last week, people in the US are worried right that we are going to see another spike in the repo rate — that is the rate that US banks pay to borrow from one another, with collateral, overnight — as the year draws to a close.We have already seen a substantial spike in repo rates this year, such as back in September when the overnight rate jumped to just shy of 10 per cent. Bear in mind that at the time, the upper limit of the fed funds target range, which the repo...

Read More »