Saturday , June 15 2019
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Dani Rodrik’s weblog

Economics for Inclusive Prosperity (EfIP)

We launched today a new initiative for academic economists that we hope will make the discipline of Economics more relevant to today’s pressing policy problems. The initiative consists of a network called Economics for Inclusive Prosperity (EfIP) with an initial set of 10 policy briefs. The briefs open with an introductory statement of our philosophy and go on to specific policy recommendations for finance, trade, labor markets, social policy, technology policy, and political...

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Economists’ statement in support of Atif Mian

It is with dismay that I learned recently that Princeton's Atif Mian, one of the greatest scholars on finance and macroeconomics I know, was disinvited from Pakistan's Economic Advisory Council because of his religious beliefs. See here and here for more background. Timur Kuran and I have put together a statement, along with many friends who support Atif. The statement is below. We already have more than 90 signatories, including 26 economists working in Pakistan and 8 Nobel Prize...

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My preface to Santiago Levy’s Book: Under-Rewarded Efforts — The Elusive Quest for Prosperity in Mexico

A few years ago as I was finishing up my book Economics Rules: The Rights and Wrongs of the Dismal Science (Norton 2015), I realized that the manuscript contained a serious omission. I had written at length about how and why economists misuse the powerful tools of their discipline, but had said little about the successes. So I decided I would open the book with three vignettes of economics at its best. Each vignette would have its hero: an economist who combined economic models with...

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My preface to Santiago Levy’s Book: Under-Rewarded Efforts — The Elusive Quest for Prosperity in Mexico

A few years ago as I was finishing up my book Economics Rules: The Rights and Wrongs of the Dismal Science (Norton 2015), I realized that the manuscript contained a serious omission. I had written at length about how and why economists misuse the powerful tools of their discipline, but had said little about the successes. So I decided I would open the book with three vignettes of economics at its best. Each vignette would have its hero: an economist who combined economic models with...

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Site Maintenance

Site Maintenance Sorry for the inconvenience but we’re performing some maintenance at the moment. We’ll be back online shortly! You've requested a page on a website (rodrik.typepad.com) that is on the Cloudflare network. Cloudflare is currently unable to resolve your requested domain (rodrik.typepad.com). Ray ID: 40cb705d97079750 Timestamp: 2018-04-17 02:25:03 UTC Your IP address: 88.99.241.248 Requested URL: rodrik.typepad.com/dani_rodriks_weblog/rss.xml...

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More on distinguishing ideas and interests — an exchange with Peter Hall

My recent post on ideas versus interests elicited some comments from Peter Hall, my Harvard colleague who has done probably more thinking on this issue than any other scholar I know. With his permission, I am attaching these comments below, along with the brief subsequent exchange we have had. ________________________________ Dani, A few quick thoughts inspired by your recent blog post on ideas and interests.  As you know, this is a topic that has long interested me.  These are rather...

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More on distinguishing ideas and interests — an exchange with Peter Hall

My recent post on ideas versus interests elicited some comments from Peter Hall, my Harvard colleague who has done probably more thinking on this issue than any other scholar I know. With his permission, I am attaching these comments below, along with the brief subsequent exchange we have had. ________________________________ Dani, A few quick thoughts inspired by your recent blog post on ideas and interests.  As you know, this is a topic that has long interested me.  These are rather...

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Has Global Finance Reformed Itself More Than It Appears?

The answer is yes, according to Ilene Grabel in her fascinating new book When Things Don't Fall Apart. I wrote a preface for the book, which is reproduced below. It explains why I liked the book so much. It happens only rarely and is all the more pleasurable because of it. You pick up a manuscript that fundamentally changes the way you look at certain things. This is one such book. Ilene Grabel has produced a daring and delightful reinterpretation of developments in global finance since...

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Has Global Finance Reformed Itself More Than It Appears?

The answer is yes, according to Ilene Grabel in her fascinating new book When Things Don't Fall Apart. I wrote a preface for the book, which is reproduced below. It explains why I liked the book so much. It happens only rarely and is all the more pleasurable because of it. You pick up a manuscript that fundamentally changes the way you look at certain things. This is one such book. Ilene Grabel has produced a daring and delightful reinterpretation of developments in global finance since...

Read More »

Telling interests and ideas apart

A long standing debate in the social sciences is whether behavior is driven by “interests” or “ideas.” The debate is central in political science, where it plays out as an argument between realists and constructivists. It is less well articulated in economics, to the discipline’s detriment. (See here for my thoughts on what economists would gain by taking the role of ideas seriously.) As constructivists like to point out, interests are “congealed ideas.” Or to put it differently, we don’t...

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