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The author Bradford DeLong
Bradford DeLong
J. Bradford DeLong is Professor of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was Deputy Assistant US Treasury Secretary during the Clinton Administration, where he was heavily involved in budget and trade negotiations. His role in designing the bailout of Mexico during the 1994 peso crisis placed him at the forefront of Latin America’s transformation into a region of open economies, and cemented his stature as a leading voice in economic-policy debates.

Brad Delong, Berkeley

Brad DeLong: Worthy reads on equitable growth, February 23–March 1, 2021

Worthy reads from Equitable Growth: 1. Across a remarkably large chunk of the United States, employers seem to think that keeping their contract with their workers is an optional thing. It is very disturbing and distressing to me that the norm that contracts are to be observed appears to of fallen to the wayside to such a substantial degree. Read Equitable Growth’s “Executive action to combat wage theft against U.S. workers,” which documents: “Wage theft against U.S. workers...

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Research on race and consumption shows why racial disparities in Unemployment Insurance receipt are detrimental to economic recovery in the United States

It’s well-established that Black and Latinx workers who lose their jobs are less likely to access Unemployment Insurance benefits than their White peers. And it’s clear this disparity means hardship at the individual level for Black and Latinx families. But what does it mean in the broader context of the COVID-induced economic crisis? Research released last year by a joint team of researchers from the University of Chicago (Peter Ganong, Damon Jones, and Pascal Noel) and the JP...

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Weekend reading: Systemic racism’s impact on Black Americans’ economic outcomes edition

This is a post we publish each Friday with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is relevant and interesting articles we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context. Equitable Growth round-up The history of violence and suppression of Black Americans...

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Other Places to Go…

## https://braddelong.substack.com> [Brad DeLong](https://www.bradford-delong.com/about_brad_delong.html): his personal [weblog](https://xkcd.com/239/). Since 1999. [Comments (mostly) welcome(https://www.bradford-delong.com/weblog-policies.html) Or email me at [email protected] with "delong-weblog" as the subject. [RSS feed(https://www.bradford-delong.com/atom.xml) [Also on twitter @delong(https://twitter.com/delong) --------

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BRIEFLY NOTED: for 2021-02-25 Th

Very Briefly Noted: Next: A Video Well Worth Your Watching: Tony Freeth: The Antikythera Mechanism A marvelous device, that if we could only understood why and how and why not a flood of such instruments following, we would understand a great deal of the world? Six Paragraphs: This, I think, gets it very right: even two weeks after your second vaccination dose, do not get together with all of your friends in a damp, hot basement and have a singing party—wait until the virus is genuinely...

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Honoring Black History Month: How the history of violence and systemic racism continue to impact economic outcomes for African Americans

Dominance and violence rooted in institutionalized racism, systemic oppression, and colonization are often to blame for the inequality that many African Americans endure today. This year’s celebration of Black History Month follows a year wrought with violence and blatant acts of racism. While it may be easier to label the more-apparent atrocities, it is equally, if not more, important to highlight the lingering impact that the historical underpinnings associated with racism and...

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READING: The Beginning of: John Q. Marquand (1937): Think Fast, Mr. Moto

John P. Marquand (1937): Think Fast, Mr. Moto: 'It had not taken Wilson Hitchings long to realize that the firm of Hitchings Brothers had its definite place in the commercial aristocracy of the East, and that China had retained a respect for mercantile tradition which had disappeared from the Occidental world. There were still traditions of sailing days and of the pre-treaty days in the transactions of the Shanghai branch of Hitchings Brothers. The position of its office upon the Bund...

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PODCAST: Hexapodia III: þe Minimum Wage, wiþ Arin Dube, Noah Smith, & Brad DeLong: Should We Be Fighting for $15?

Listen in podcast app If moderate raises in the minimum wage do not cause unemployment, who can object to them—but why do they not cause higher unemployment, if they in fact do not? Share Subscribe now RSS URL: Reference: Arin Dube (2019): Impacts of Minimum Wages: Review of the International Evidence: Share Grasping Reality Newsletter, by Brad DeLong Leave a comment

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HOISTED FROM ÞE ARCHIVES: Regional & Distributional Policy in a World Where People Want to Ignore þe Value & Contribution of Knowledge- & Network-Based Increasing Returns

Pascal Lamy: “When the wise man points at the moon, the fool looks at the finger…” Perhaps, in the end, the problem is that people want to pretend that they are filling a valuable role in the societal division of labor, and are receiving no more than they earn—than they contribute. But that is not the case. The value—the societal dividend—is in the accumulated knowledge of humanity and in the painfully constructed networks that make up our value chains. A “contribution” theory...

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Executive action to combat wage theft against U.S. workers

Relevant federal offices and agencies: Wage and Hour Division of the U.S. Department of LaborRelevant laws: The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. § 203) Overview Wage theft against U.S. workers exacerbates the long-run problem of low and stagnant wages. When companies commit wage theft, they impoverish families and deprive workers of the just compensation for their hard work, robbing workers of the value they contribute to economic growth and...

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