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The author Bradford DeLong
Bradford DeLong
J. Bradford DeLong is Professor of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was Deputy Assistant US Treasury Secretary during the Clinton Administration, where he was heavily involved in budget and trade negotiations. His role in designing the bailout of Mexico during the 1994 peso crisis placed him at the forefront of Latin America’s transformation into a region of open economies, and cemented his stature as a leading voice in economic-policy debates.

Brad Delong, Berkeley

Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson will bring new perspectives on mass incarceration to U.S. Supreme Court jurisprudence

Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson made history today after the U.S. Senate confirmed her nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court by a vote of 53 to 47. The Senate vote sealed her position as the first Black woman to serve on the Supreme Court in its 233-year history. Justice Jackson’s confirmation gives the nine-member court four women and two Black justices for the first time ever. She will also be the first former public defender to serve on the nation’s highest court, its second-ever...

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Kate Bahn testimony before the Select Committee on Economic Disparity and Fairness in Growth on imbalance of power

Kate Bahn Washington Center for Equitable Growth Testimony before the Select Committee on Economic Disparity and Fairness in Growth, Hearing on “(Im)Balance of Power: How Market Concentration Affects Worker Compensation & Consumer Prices” April 6, 2022 Thank you, Chair Himes, Ranking Member Steil, and members of the Select Committee on Economic Disparity and Fairness in Growth, for inviting me to testify today. My name is Kate Bahn, and I am the director of labor...

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Understanding the economics of monopsony: How labor markets work under imperfect competition

Contrary to what many of us were taught in Introduction to Economics courses in college and graduate school, markets are rarely perfectly competitive. In the case of the market for labor—a market that, it is worth noting, is fundamentally different from those where financial products or commodities are bought and sold—imperfect competition means that workers’ pay is solely determined neither by their productivity nor by the forces of supply and demand. In recent years, rising...

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Jobs report: U.S. employment data shows continuing strong job gains, with employment in the warehousing and transportation industry well-above pre-pandemic levels

The U.S. economy experienced another month of strong employment gains between mid-February and mid-March, adding 431,000 new jobs. According to the most recent Employment Situation Summary released this morning by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the overall unemployment rate is now nearly at its pre-pandemic rate of 3.5 percent, falling from 3.8 percent in February to 3.6 percent in March. The share of 25- to 54-year-olds with a job—a statistic known as the “prime-age...

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Equitable Growth’s Jobs Day Graphs: March 2022 Report Edition

On April 1, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics released new data on the U.S. labor market during the month of March. Below are five graphs compiled by Equitable Growth staff highlighting important trends in the data. Total nonfarm employment rose by 431,000 in March, and the employment rate for prime-age workersincreased to 80.0 percent. The unemployment rate fell to 3.6 percent. It remains higher for Black workers (6.2 percent) and Latino workers (4.2 percent)...

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Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management conference spotlights the value of diversity in U.S. policy analysis and research

Earlier this week, the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management held its 2021 fall conference in Austin, Texas. The event, which was rescheduled late last year due to the coronavirus pandemic, is an annual multidisciplinary conference that brings together researchers and practitioners to present evidence and discuss ways to improve public policy. APPAM’s theme for the conference this year was “The Power of Inclusion: Incorporating Diverse Voices in...

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The 2022 Midwest Economic Association annual meeting features key sessions on labor market monopsony

The Midwest Economic Association held its 86th annual meeting this past weekend, featuring six important sessions on labor market monopsony that the Washington Center for Equitable Growth co-organized as part of its ongoing commitment to support new research on inequality and growth, as well as increase diversity in the economics profession by supporting scholars in various phases of their careers and from an array of backgrounds and institutions. The six sessions on various topics...

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Diversity in Economics: I never thought about becoming an economist

Equitable Growth talks with Carlos Fernando Avenancio Leon in this inaugural installment of Diversity in Economics. Learn more about Carlos and his work at https://equitablegrowth.org/people/carlos-avenancio/ and https://www.avenancioleon.com/ 0:00 Intro 0:11 Can you tell us a bit about your professional life? 1:13 What motivated you to become an economist? 2:05 What were some of the challenges you face to become an economist? 3:45 What pushed you to leave home and go for it? 6:01 How...

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JOLTS Day Graphs: February 2022 Edition

Every month the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics releases data on hiring, firing, and other labor market flows from the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, better known as JOLTS. Today, the BLS released the latest data for February 2022. This report doesn’t get as much attention as the monthly Employment Situation Report, but it contains useful information about the state of the U.S. labor market. Below are a few key graphs using data from the report. The...

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