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The author Bradford DeLong
Bradford DeLong
J. Bradford DeLong is Professor of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was Deputy Assistant US Treasury Secretary during the Clinton Administration, where he was heavily involved in budget and trade negotiations. His role in designing the bailout of Mexico during the 1994 peso crisis placed him at the forefront of Latin America’s transformation into a region of open economies, and cemented his stature as a leading voice in economic-policy debates.

Brad Delong, Berkeley

Weekend reading: Supporting workers, regardless of employment status, edition

This is a post we publish each Friday with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is relevant and interesting articles we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context. Equitable Growth round-up The coronavirus recession is resulting in millions of...

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Addressing long-term U.S. unemployment requires confronting the stigma against the unemployed amid the coronavirus recession

Overview Six months into a pandemic that is keeping many businesses closed across the United States, and with close to 1 million new unemployment claims continuing to be added each week, there should be widespread agreement that unemployed workers are blameless for their condition. Yet stereotypes that find fault with jobless workers are already appearing amid the coronavirus recession and are an obstacle to economic recovery that threatens to leave lasting scars on unemployed...

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Labor in the Boardroom: A Model for the United States?

Under U.S. law, corporate boards of directors represent the interests of companies’ shareholders. This is reflected in the typical composition of boards, composed almost entirely of people from the business world, with some from the nonprofit sector and other elements of the private sector mixed in. Because boards of directors oversee the management of companies, they have fiduciary responsibilities to look at corporate strategy, hiring, and other decision-making through the lens of...

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Brad DeLong: Worthy reads on equitable growth, October 14-19, 2020

Worthy reads from Equitable Growth: 1. Unless we know where we are, we will be unable to figure out where we need to go. And we do not know where we are. Thus one of our very top priorities should be oversampling minorities to help us figure out exactly how far away we are from equal opportunity. Read Austin Clemens and Michael Garvey, “Structural racism and the coronavirus recession highlight why more andbetter U.S. data need to be widely disaggregated by race and ethnicity,” in...

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Cowen: Reject the Great Barrington Declaration—Noted

...here is one bit.... Here are the key words of the Great Barrington Declaration on herd immunity: The most compassionate approach that balances the risks and benefits of reaching herd immunity, is to allow those who are at minimal risk of death to live their lives normally to build up immunity to the virus through natural infection, while better protecting those who are at highest risk. We call this Focused Protection. What exactly does the...

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Weekend reading: Helping U.S. families stay out of poverty and build wealth edition

This is a post we publish each Friday with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is relevant and interesting articles we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context. Equitable Growth round-up The Voting Rights Act of 1965 is probably best known for...

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Voting rights equal economic progress: The Voting Rights Act and U.S. economic inequality

People line up on the first day of early voting in Arlington, VA. to vote in the 2020 presidential election.Overview The civil rights movement, from its mid-20th century growth and successes to its current manifestations, has had a dual focus of eliminating political and social discrimination and bettering the economic lot of Black Americans, as well as that of other people of color in the United States. From the beginning, leaders of the movement and their political allies...

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The Effect of Political Power on Labor Market Inequality: Evidence from the 1965 Voting Rights Act

Download File101620-WP-The Effect of Political Power on Labor Market Inequality-Aneja and Avenancio-Leon Authors: Abhay Aneja, University of California, BerkeleyCarlos Fernando Avenancio-León, Indiana University Bloomington Abstract: A central concern for racial and ethnic minorities is having an equal opportunity to advance group interests via the political process. There remains limited empirical evidence, however, whether democratic...

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Briefly Noted for 2020-10-16

Philippe Weil (1989): The Equity Premium Puzzle & the Riskfree Rate Puzzle https://github.com/braddelong/public-files/blob/master/readings/article-weil-1989-riskfree.pdf... Donald Harris: Introduction to Bukharin: “Theory of the Leisure Class” https://github.com/braddelong/public-files/blob/master/readings/article-harris-bukharin-intro.pdf… Constance L. Hunter: Economic Outlook: Riding the COVID-Coaster...

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