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The author Bradford DeLong
Bradford DeLong
J. Bradford DeLong is Professor of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was Deputy Assistant US Treasury Secretary during the Clinton Administration, where he was heavily involved in budget and trade negotiations. His role in designing the bailout of Mexico during the 1994 peso crisis placed him at the forefront of Latin America’s transformation into a region of open economies, and cemented his stature as a leading voice in economic-policy debates.

Brad Delong, Berkeley

Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality 2020-01-21 20:24:39

Anonymous: The Man Who Saw the Deep (Gilgamesh) https://delong.typepad.com/files/gilgamesh.pdf: 'Surpassing all kings, powerful and tall beyond all others, violent, splendid, a wild bull of a man, unvanquished leader, hero in the front lines, beloved by his soldiers... ...Who is like Gilgamesh? What other king has inspired such awe? Who else can say, “I alone rule, supreme among mankind”? The goddess Aruru, mother of creation, had designed his body, had made him the strongest of...

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Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality 2020-01-21 19:42:01

Terence Bell: The Ancient History of Copper https://www.thebalance.com/copper-history-pt-i-2340112: 'Although various copper tools and decorative items dating back as early as 9000 BC have been discovered, archaeological evidence suggests that it was the early Mesopotamians who, around 5000 to 6000 years ago, were the first to fully harness the ability to extract and work with copper. Lacking modern knowledge of metallurgy, early societies, including the Mesopotamians, Egyptians, and...

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Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality 2020-01-21 19:39:46

History.com: Bronze Age https://www.history.com/topics/pre-history/bronze-age: 'Sumer: By the fourth millennium BCE, Sumerians had established roughly a dozen city-states throughout ancient Mesopotamia, including Eridu and Uruk in what is now southern Iraq. Sumerians called themselves the Sag-giga, the “black-headed ones.” They were among the first to use bronze. They also pioneered the use of levees and canals for irrigation. Sumerians invented cuneiform script, one of the earliest forms...

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Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality 2020-01-21 19:34:17

Julka Kuzmanovic-Cvetkovic: Neolithic Vinca was a Metallurgical Culture https://www.stonepages.com/news/archives/002605.html: 'The unnamed tribe who lived between 5400 and 4700 BCE in the 120-hectare site at what is now Plocnik knew about trade, handcrafts, art and metallurgy. Near the settlement, a thermal well might be evidence of Europe’s oldest spa. "They pursued beauty and produced 60 different forms of wonderful pottery and figurines, not only to represent deities, but also out of...

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Model Economic History Papers

* **Marc Dordal i Carreras** (2015): “U.S. Banking Panics and the Credit Channel: Evidence from 1870-1904” * **Daniel Gross** (2016): “Scale versus Scope in the Diffusion of New Technology: Evidence from the Farm Tractor”, Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 16-108 * **Petra Moser** (2005): “How Do Patent Laws Influence Innovation?: Evidence from Nineteenth-Century World Fairs”, The American Economic Review,...

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Weekly Economic History Memo Questions Bank

The Usefulness[?] of Economic History Readings: Memo 2: The Industrial Revolution Compared to what we have seen in our lives—and in the lives of our parents, grandparents, and even great-grandparents—the pace of productivity growth and economic structural change even in Britain over 1700-1850 seems appallingly slow. Compared to what came earlier it seems remarkably rapid. Frame several possible hypotheses about why either British growth 1700-1850 was so much faster than western European...

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For the Weekend: Matthew Arnold: Dover Beach

The sea is calm to-night. The tide is full, the moon lies fair Upon the straits;–on the French coast the light Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand, Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay. Come to the window, sweet is the night-air! Only, from the long line of spray Where the sea meets the moon-blanch’d land, Listen! you hear the grating roar Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling, At their return, up the high strand, Begin, and cease, and then again begin,...

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1.1. Theory: Robert Solow’s Growth Model: The History of Economic Growth: Econ 135

### Th Jan 23: Robert Solow's Growth Model * **Read**: J. Bradford DeLong: Lecture Notes: The Solow Growth Model * **Read**: Partha Dasgupta (2007): Economics: A Very Short Introduction, chapters 5-8 & Epilogue * **Do** Assignment 2 (3 pts): Letter to GSI, due Sa Jan 25 9:00 am ---- #### Notes & Further Readings: * Reading Notes on Dasgupta's _Economics: A Very Short Introduction_ ---- #econ_135 #berkeley #economicgrowth #economichistory #teaching...

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Lecture Notes: The Solow Growth Model: The History of Economic Growth: Econ 135

The Python code in the Solow growth model notebooks that are the lecture notes is static: it has been executed. But the best way to understand what is going on in the Python code—in the Solow growth model—is for you to play with the code and so conduct what-if simulation experiments with the model yourself. In the last cell of each notebnook there is a datahub link, something like...

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0. Introduction: The History of Economic Growth: Econ 135

### T Jan 21: Growth in Historical Perspective, Humans and Their Economies * **Read**: Gregory Clark (2005): _The Condition of the Working Class in England, 1209-2003_ * **Read**: Lant Pritchett (1997): _Divergence, Big Time_ * **Slides**: ---- #### Notes & Further Readings: * Reading Notes on Clark's _The Condition of the Working Class in England, 1209-2003_ * Reading Notes on Pritchett's _Divergence, Big Time_ ---- #econ_135 #berkeley...

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