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The author Bradford DeLong
Bradford DeLong
J. Bradford DeLong is Professor of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was Deputy Assistant US Treasury Secretary during the Clinton Administration, where he was heavily involved in budget and trade negotiations. His role in designing the bailout of Mexico during the 1994 peso crisis placed him at the forefront of Latin America’s transformation into a region of open economies, and cemented his stature as a leading voice in economic-policy debates.

Brad Delong, Berkeley

Weekend reading: Antitrust enforcement and the FTC’s authority edition

This is a post we publish each Friday with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is relevant and interesting articles we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context. Equitable Growth round-up In April, the Supreme Court in AMG Capital Management LLC...

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Competitive Edge: Congress needs to restore the Federal Trade Commission’s authority to seek monetary remedies when companies break the law

Antitrust and competition issues are receiving renewed interest, and for good reason. So far, the discussion has occurred at a high level of generality. To address important specific antitrust enforcement and competition issues, the Washington Center for Equitable Growth has launched this blog, which we call “Competitive Edge.” This series features leading experts in antitrust enforcement on a broad range of topics: potential areas for antitrust enforcement, concerns about existing...

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Competitive Edge: The silver lining for antitrust enforcement in the Supreme Court’s embrace of “textualism”

Antitrust and competition issues are receiving renewed interest, and for good reason. So far, the discussion has occurred at a high level of generality. To address important specific antitrust enforcement and competition issues, the Washington Center for Equitable Growth has launched this blog, which we call “Competitive Edge.” This series features leading experts in antitrust enforcement on a broad range of topics: potential areas for antitrust enforcement, concerns about existing...

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Expert Focus: From academia to the administration, Equitable Growth scholars transition to executive branch

Equitable Growth is committed to building a community of scholars working to understand how inequality affects broadly shared growth and stability. To that end, we have created the monthly series, “Expert Focus.” This series highlights scholars in the Equitable Growth network and beyond who are at the frontier of social science research. We encourage you to learn more about both the researchers featured below, those featured in prior installments, and our broader network of experts....

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NBER Summer Institute 2021 Round-up: Week 2

On July 12, the National Bureau of Economic Research kicked off its summer institute, an annual 3-week conference featuring discussions and paper presentations on specific subfields of economics, including wealth taxation and tax evasion, market structure and competition, and labor market inequalities. This year’s NBER event is being held virtually due to the coronavirus pandemic and is being livestreamed on YouTube. We’re excited to see Equitable Growth’s grantee network, Steering...

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Brad DeLong: Worthy reads on equitable growth, July 20-26, 2021

Worthy reads from Equitable Growth: 1. I would put this analysis more strongly. The price level now is 10 percent below where consensus forecasts that it would be a decade ago. In that context, a quarter—or a year, or two years—of 5 percent-a-year inflation is simply not an issue. Read Francesco D’Acunto and Michael Weber, “A temporary increase in inflation is not a long-run threat to U.S. economic growth and prosperity,” in which they write: “Recent 5 percent inflation rate...

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Weekend reading: The impact of climate change and heat waves on U.S. workers edition

This is a post we publish each Friday with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is relevant and interesting articles we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context. Equitable Growth round-up On July 12, the National Bureau of Economic Research...

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