Saturday , July 11 2020
Home / Brad Delong, Berkeley / I Find Alberto Alesina’s Death Very Sad…

I Find Alberto Alesina’s Death Very Sad…

Summary:
Ben was much closer to my friend Alberto Alesina than I was, so I pass him the mic: Benjamin Schoefer: 'Incredibly sad news https://twitter.com/Schoefer_B/status/1264382682089156609. Alberto Alesina was one of the three economists that led me to study economics, and a wonderful human being. One of my fondest memories includes a day in Jerusalem with Alberto and @joana_naritomi. I wish I could have met him one last time. Rest in peace.... "From @Cutler_econ Dear economist friends. I am very sad to report that Alberto Alesina passed away today. Apparently, he was hiking with his beloved wife Susan and had a heart attack. He was a great treasure whom we shall all miss… #asknotforwhomthebelltolls #economists #noted #2020-05-27

Topics:
Bradford DeLong considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Bradford DeLong writes Black: Cracking—Noted

Bradford DeLong writes Campos: The Trump Delusion—Noted

Bradford DeLong writes Higgins & Klitgaard: Japan’s Experience with Yield Curve Control—Noted

Bradford DeLong writes Time for Another Ethics Panel: Keyvan—Noted

Ben was much closer to my friend Alberto Alesina than I was, so I pass him the mic: Benjamin Schoefer: 'Incredibly sad news https://twitter.com/Schoefer_B/status/1264382682089156609. Alberto Alesina was one of the three economists that led me to study economics, and a wonderful human being. One of my fondest memories includes a day in Jerusalem with Alberto and @joana_naritomi. I wish I could have met him one last time. Rest in peace.... "From @Cutler_econ Dear economist friends. I am very sad to report that Alberto Alesina passed away today. Apparently, he was hiking with his beloved wife Susan and had a heart attack. He was a great treasure whom we shall all miss… #asknotforwhomthebelltolls #economists #noted #2020-05-27

Bradford DeLong
J. Bradford DeLong is Professor of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was Deputy Assistant US Treasury Secretary during the Clinton Administration, where he was heavily involved in budget and trade negotiations. His role in designing the bailout of Mexico during the 1994 peso crisis placed him at the forefront of Latin America’s transformation into a region of open economies, and cemented his stature as a leading voice in economic-policy debates.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *