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Brad DeLong's Grasping Reality 2019-10-13 14:38:58

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From 2011: Matthew Yglesias is trying to understand how there can be an ethnicism that calls itself "Christian". In the4 United States you can trace it to the emergence of the Peculiar Institution. In Britain—and among Britons and ex-Britons—I confess I am at a loss: Matthew Yglesias (2011): John Derbyshire of National Review Wants To ‘Let Britain Burn’: "It’s one thing if you want to call 'deracinated moral universalism' a 'sick' principle. But it’s very strange to combine this with table-pounding about Christianity. I’m no Christian, personally, but deracinated moral universalism is one of Christianity’s best and most worthy contributions to human thought. I, for example, am not British nor am I descended from British people. But despite the lack of ties of blood, it seems to me

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From 2011: Matthew Yglesias is trying to understand how there can be an ethnicism that calls itself "Christian". In the4 United States you can trace it to the emergence of the Peculiar Institution. In Britain—and among Britons and ex-Britons—I confess I am at a loss:

Matthew Yglesias (2011): John Derbyshire of National Review Wants To ‘Let Britain Burn’: "It’s one thing if you want to call 'deracinated moral universalism' a 'sick' principle. But it’s very strange to combine this with table-pounding about Christianity. I’m no Christian, personally, but deracinated moral universalism is one of Christianity’s best and most worthy contributions to human thought. I, for example, am not British nor am I descended from British people. But despite the lack of ties of blood, it seems to me that it’s sad if British people get hurt or killed or have their property damaged in rioting. You can see that as being because we’re all God’s children and equal in His eyes, or as a non-theological statement of human equality. In either case, I think it would be very sad for the country to burn...

Bradford DeLong
J. Bradford DeLong is Professor of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was Deputy Assistant US Treasury Secretary during the Clinton Administration, where he was heavily involved in budget and trade negotiations. His role in designing the bailout of Mexico during the 1994 peso crisis placed him at the forefront of Latin America’s transformation into a region of open economies, and cemented his stature as a leading voice in economic-policy debates.

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