Wednesday , August 15 2018
Home / Brad Delong, Berkeley / Should-Read: Marta Lachowska, Alexandre Mas, Stephen Woodbury: Sources of displaced workers’ long-term earnings losses

Should-Read: Marta Lachowska, Alexandre Mas, Stephen Woodbury: Sources of displaced workers’ long-term earnings losses

Summary:
Should-Read: Marta Lachowska, Alexandre Mas, Stephen Woodbury: Sources of displaced workers’ long-term earnings losses: “We estimate the earnings losses of a cohort of workers displaced during the Great Recession… …decompose those long-term losses into components attributable to fewer work hours and to reduced hourly wage rates. We also examine the extent to which the reduced earnings, work hours, and wages of these displaced workers can be attributed to factors specific to pre- and post-displacement employers; that is, to employer-specific fixed effects. The analysis is based on employer-employee linked panel data from Washington State assembled from 2002-2014 administrative wage and unemployment insurance (UI) records. Three main findings emerge from the empirical work. First,

Topics:
Bradford DeLong considers the following as important:

This could be interesting, too:

Delaney Crampton writes Weekend reading: “barriers to economic equality” edition

Equitable Growth writes Examining the links between rising wage inequality and the decline of unions

Bradford DeLong writes Brad DeLong: Worthy reads on equitable growth, May 25-31, 2018

Bridget Ansel writes A look at the motherhood wage gap on Mother’s Equal Pay Day

Should-Read: Marta Lachowska, Alexandre Mas, Stephen Woodbury: Sources of displaced workers’ long-term earnings losses: “We estimate the earnings losses of a cohort of workers displaced during the Great Recession…

…decompose those long-term losses into components attributable to fewer work hours and to reduced hourly wage rates. We also examine the extent to which the reduced earnings, work hours, and wages of these displaced workers can be attributed to factors specific to pre- and post-displacement employers; that is, to employer-specific fixed effects. The analysis is based on employer-employee linked panel data from Washington State assembled from 2002-2014 administrative wage and unemployment insurance (UI) records.

Three main findings emerge from the empirical work. First, five years after job loss, the earnings of these displaced workers were 16 percent less than those of comparison groups of nondisplaced workers. Second, earnings losses within a year of displacement can be explained almost entirely by lost work hours; however, five years after displacement, the relative earnings deficit of displaced workers can be attributed roughly 40 percent to reduced hourly wages and 60 percent to reduced work hours. Third, for the average displaced worker, lost employer-specific premiums account for about 11 percent of long-term earnings losses and nearly 25 percent of lower long-term hourly wages. For workers displaced from employers paying top-quintile earnings premiums (about 60 percent of the displaced workers in the sample), lost employer specific premiums account for more than half of long-term earnings losses and 83 percent of lower long-term hourly wages…

Bradford DeLong
J. Bradford DeLong is Professor of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was Deputy Assistant US Treasury Secretary during the Clinton Administration, where he was heavily involved in budget and trade negotiations. His role in designing the bailout of Mexico during the 1994 peso crisis placed him at the forefront of Latin America’s transformation into a region of open economies, and cemented his stature as a leading voice in economic-policy debates.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *