Saturday , June 24 2017
Home / Brad Delong, Berkeley / Reading: Robert Brenner (1979): Agrarian Class Structure and Economic Development in Pre-Industrial Europe

Reading: Robert Brenner (1979): Agrarian Class Structure and Economic Development in Pre-Industrial Europe

Summary:
Robert Brenner (1979): Agrarian Class Structure and Economic Development in Pre-Industrial Europe, Past & Present 70 (Feb.), pp. 30-75 MOAR Readings: T. H. Aston (Editor) and C. H. E. Philpin, eds. (1987): The Brenner Debate: Agrarian Class Structure and Economic Development in Pre-industrial Europe (New York: Cambridge University Press: 0521349338) Dietrich Vollrath (2017): Who Are You Calling “Malthusian”? Quamrul Ashraf and Oded Galor (2011): Dynamics and Stagnation in the Malthusian Epoch Daniel Little (2010): The Brenner Debate Revisited Jonathan Conning (2007): On ‘The Causes of Slavery or Serfdom’ and the Roads to Agrarian Capitalism: Domar’s Hypothesis Revisited Robert Brenner: Is It a Good Thing If Your Labor Becomes More Valuable?: The pre-Brenner story of the collapse of serfdom and the rise of wage labor Bubonic Plague: thereafter labor doesn’t have to enserf itself for protection but can bargain for freedom And then bargain for wages Wait a minute! In 1550 labor of Africans became much more valuable! The Brenner Thesis: Late-Roman consolidation of “serfdom” Medieval entrenchment of “villainage” Rising commercial prosperity 950-1350? Effect on western European rural institutions? 1348 and All That Peasant prosperity? Or from labor lords to landlords? And when? Post-1100 largely-Germanic migration to the east… Post-1500: The grain-shortage North

Topics:
Bradford DeLong considers the following as important: , , , , , , , , , ,

This could be interesting, too:

Tyler Cowen writes *Regulation and Economic Growth*

Mark Thoma writes Pure Class Warfare, With Extra Contempt

Tyler Cowen writes How and why did economic history blossom?

Tyler Cowen writes The new Charles C. Mann book, *The Wizard and the Prophet*

Robert Brenner (1979): Agrarian Class Structure and Economic Development in Pre-Industrial Europe, Past & Present 70 (Feb.), pp. 30-75 <http://www.jstor.org/stable/650345>

MOAR Readings:

Robert Brenner: Is It a Good Thing If Your Labor Becomes More Valuable?:

  • The pre-Brenner story of the collapse of serfdom and the rise of wage labor
  • Bubonic Plague: thereafter labor doesn’t have to enserf itself for protection but can bargain for freedom
  • And then bargain for wages
  • Wait a minute! In 1550 labor of Africans became much more valuable!

The Brenner Thesis:

  • Late-Roman consolidation of “serfdom”
  • Medieval entrenchment of “villainage”
  • Rising commercial prosperity 950-1350?
  • Effect on western European rural institutions?
  • 1348 and All That
    • Peasant prosperity?
    • Or from labor lords to landlords?
    • And when?
  • Post-1100 largely-Germanic migration to the east…
  • Post-1500:
    • The grain-shortage North Sea area
    • The “Second Serfdom”
    • The steppe frontier:
      • Avars, Magyars, Mongols, the Golden Horde, the Tatars, the Hetmanate, and the Hosts...

NewImage

NewImage

NewImage

NewImage

key: <https://www.icloud.com/keynote/0CstjEXcWIH6-PmGs7_YGoegQ#2017-02-08_Brenner_.IEH>

Bradford DeLong
J. Bradford DeLong is Professor of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was Deputy Assistant US Treasury Secretary during the Clinton Administration, where he was heavily involved in budget and trade negotiations. His role in designing the bailout of Mexico during the 1994 peso crisis placed him at the forefront of Latin America’s transformation into a region of open economies, and cemented his stature as a leading voice in economic-policy debates.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *