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Should-Read: Kevin Drum: Here’s Why CBO Projects 10% Lower Premiums Under the Republican Health Care Bill

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Should-Read: Kevin Drum: Here’s Why CBO Projects 10% Lower Premiums Under the Republican Health Care Bill: “One of the surprising things about the CBO score of… the Republican health care bill… is… that premiums will fall starting in 2020. By 2026… 10 percent lower than they would be under Obamacare. But why…. CBO didn’t do anything wrong here. They simply did their projections based on a (correct) assumption that AHCA would be too expensive for many old people and would produce crappier policies that had higher deductibles and paid far less of your medical bills. The “average” premium is lower, but obviously not in a way that helps anybody in real life.

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Should-Read: Kevin Drum: Here’s Why CBO Projects 10% Lower Premiums Under the Republican Health Care Bill: “One of the surprising things about the CBO score of… the Republican health care bill…

is… that premiums will fall starting in 2020. By 2026… 10 percent lower than they would be under Obamacare. But why…. CBO didn’t do anything wrong here. They simply did their projections based on a (correct) assumption that AHCA would be too expensive for many old people and would produce crappier policies that had higher deductibles and paid far less of your medical bills. The “average” premium is lower, but obviously not in a way that helps anybody in real life.

Bradford DeLong
J. Bradford DeLong is Professor of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was Deputy Assistant US Treasury Secretary during the Clinton Administration, where he was heavily involved in budget and trade negotiations. His role in designing the bailout of Mexico during the 1994 peso crisis placed him at the forefront of Latin America’s transformation into a region of open economies, and cemented his stature as a leading voice in economic-policy debates.

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