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bradford-delong.com: Grasping Reality with Both Hands 2017-02-16 01:03:20

Summary:
Should-Read: Tirthankar Roy: Were Indian Famines ‘Natural’ Or ‘Manmade’?: "I review the theories of Indian famines and suggest that a mainly geographical account... ...diminishes the role of the state in the occurrence and retreat of famines, whereas a mainly political account overstates that role. I stress a third factor, knowledge, and suggest that limited information and knowledge constrained state capacity to act during the nineteenth century famines. As statistical information and scientific knowledge improved, and prediction of and response to famines improved, famines became rarer.

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Should-Read: Tirthankar Roy: Were Indian Famines ‘Natural’ Or ‘Manmade’?: "I review the theories of Indian famines and suggest that a mainly geographical account...

...diminishes the role of the state in the occurrence and retreat of famines, whereas a mainly political account overstates that role. I stress a third factor, knowledge, and suggest that limited information and knowledge constrained state capacity to act during the nineteenth century famines. As statistical information and scientific knowledge improved, and prediction of and response to famines improved, famines became rarer.

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Bradford DeLong
J. Bradford DeLong is Professor of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He was Deputy Assistant US Treasury Secretary during the Clinton Administration, where he was heavily involved in budget and trade negotiations. His role in designing the bailout of Mexico during the 1994 peso crisis placed him at the forefront of Latin America’s transformation into a region of open economies, and cemented his stature as a leading voice in economic-policy debates.